Historical citizen science to understand and predict climate-driven trout decline

Clavero, M., Ninyerola, M., Hermoso, V., Filipe, A.F., Pla, M., Villero, D., Brotons, L., Delibes, M. (2017) Historical citizen science to understand and predict climate-driven trout decline. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 284: 0-0.
Link
Doi: 10.1098/rspb.2016.1979

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A review of the combination among global change factors in forests, shrublands and pastures of the Mediterranean Region: Beyond drought effects

Doblas-Miranda, E., Alonso, R., Arnan, X., Bermejo, V., Brotons, L., de las Heras, J., Estiarte, M., Hódar, J.A., Llorens, P., Lloret, F., López-Serrano, F.R., Martínez-Vilalta, J., Moya, D., Peñuelas, J., Pino, J., Rodrigo, A., Roura-Pascual, N., Valladares, F., Vilà, M., Zamora, R., Retana, J. (2017) A review of the combination among global change factors in forests, shrublands and pastures of the Mediterranean Region: Beyond drought effects. Global and Planetary Change. 148: 42-54.
Link
Doi: 10.1016/j.gloplacha.2016.11.012

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Indicators of the effects of the urban greening on birds: The case of Barcelona

Herrando, S., Brotons, L., Anton, M., Franch, M., Quesada, J., Ferrer, X. (2017) Indicators of the effects of the urban greening on birds: The case of Barcelona. Ecology and Conservation of Birds in Urban Environments. : 449-463.
Link
Doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-43314-1_22

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Using fire to promote biodiversity

Kelly, L.T., Brotons, L. (2017) Using fire to promote biodiversity. Science. 355: 1264-1265.
Link
Doi: 10.1126/science.aam7672

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Geographical variation in reproductive investment across avian assemblages in Europe: Effects of environmental drivers differ between altricial and precocial species

Kopsová-Storchová L., Storch D., Brotons L., Hořák D. (2017) Geographical variation in reproductive investment across avian assemblages in Europe: Effects of environmental drivers differ between altricial and precocial species. Journal of Avian Biology. : 0-0.
Link
Doi: 10.1111/jav.01131

Abstract:

Reproductive traits provide information about the ways by which available resources are allocated during breeding. We tested for environmental drivers of large scale geographical patterns in assemblage mean clutch size, number of broods and overall reproductive investment per breeding season in European birds. We combined data about geographical distribution with published information about reproductive traits, and calculated mean trait values for avian assemblages occurring in 50 × 50 km grid cells. In total, we employed data from 499 species and 2059 assemblages. As the time available for breeding and the amount of food limit the reproductive effort, we related the geographical variation in reproductive traits to the length of breeding season, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) as a surrogate of resource availability, and its seasonality. Geographical patterns in traits may differ between reproductive modes, thus we performed the analyses separately for altricial Passerines (n = 203) and precocial non-passerine species (n = 164) and controlled for the effect of taxonomy. Large clutches dominated in areas with high NDVI and, in precocial birds, also in areas with high annual seasonality and a long breeding season. High number of broods and high overall reproductive investment dominated in areas with a long breeding season, and high number of broods was found also in areas with low annual seasonality, but only in precocial species. High overall reproductive investment dominated in highly productive areas and also in areas with low annual seasonality in both groups. The increase in reproductive investment is caused mostly by an increase in the number of broods related to the length of season and partly by increase in clutch size related to NDVI. We found a negative correlation between clutch size and the number of broods in Passerines, which might suggest a trade-off between these traits. Processes behind trait patterns differ between altricial and precocial species. © 2017 Nordic Society Oikos.

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Setting temporal baselines for biodiversity: The limits of available monitoring data for capturing the full impact of anthropogenic pressures

Mihoub, J.-B., Henle, K., Titeux, N., Brotons, L., Brummitt, N.A., Schmeller, D.S. (2017) Setting temporal baselines for biodiversity: The limits of available monitoring data for capturing the full impact of anthropogenic pressures. Scientific Reports. 7: 0-0.
Link
Doi: 10.1038/srep41591

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Aridity influences the recovery of vegetation and shrubland birds after wildfire

Puig-Gironès, R., Brotons, L., Pons, P. (2017) Aridity influences the recovery of vegetation and shrubland birds after wildfire. PLoS ONE. 12: 0-0.
Link
Doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0173599

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Wildfire-vegetation dynamics affect predictions of climate change impact on bird communities

Regos, A., Clavero, M., D'Amen, M., Guisan, A., Brotons, L. (2017) Wildfire-vegetation dynamics affect predictions of climate change impact on bird communities. Ecography. : 0-0.
Link
Doi: 10.1111/ecog.02990

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Unmanned aircraft systems to unravel spatial and temporal factors affecting dynamics of colony formation and nesting success in birds

Sardà-Palomera F., Bota G., Padilla N., Brotons L., Sardà F. (2017) Unmanned aircraft systems to unravel spatial and temporal factors affecting dynamics of colony formation and nesting success in birds. Journal of Avian Biology. : 0-0.
Link
Doi: 10.1111/jav.01535

Abstract:

Collecting information of ecological and behavioural processes often requires continuous field monitoring, however, reiterative human presence necessary to obtain monitoring data can disturb both the environment and the study species. An example of this phenomenon is the monitoring of the formation and dynamics of seabird colonies; one of the reasons for colony failure is disturbances caused by the presence of researchers or conservation managers during data collection. In this study, an unmanned aircraft system (UAS) was used throughout the breeding period to monitor the temporal and spatial dynamics of a black-headed gull colony in the interior of a difficult-to-access island. This methodology permitted weekly visits to the colony without disturbance, which allowed for the continuous collection of spatial and temporal data on the process of colony formation. We obtained detailed information about nesting success and its relation with the distance to the nearest incubating neighbour, as well as the colony boundary along breeding season. Thus, we successfully monitored the dynamics of a bird colony and identified factors affecting individual decision making in colony formation using a UAS. © 2017 Nordic Society Oikos.

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A suite of essential biodiversity variables for detecting critical biodiversity change

Schmeller D.S., Weatherdon L.V., Loyau A., Bondeau A., Brotons L., Brummitt N., Geijzendorffer I.R., Haase P., Kuemmerlen M., Martin C.S., Mihoub J.-B., Rocchini D., Saarenmaa H., Stoll S., Regan E.C. (2017) A suite of essential biodiversity variables for detecting critical biodiversity change. Biological Reviews. : 0-0.
Link
Doi: 10.1111/brv.12332

Abstract:

Key global indicators of biodiversity decline, such as the IUCN Red List Index and the Living Planet Index, have relatively long assessment intervals. This means they, due to their inherent structure, function as late-warning indicators that are retrospective, rather than prospective. These indicators are unquestionably important in providing information for biodiversity conservation, but the detection of early-warning signs of critical biodiversity change is also needed so that proactive management responses can be enacted promptly where required. Generally, biodiversity conservation has dealt poorly with the scattered distribution of necessary detailed information, and needs to find a solution to assemble, harmonize and standardize the data. The prospect of monitoring essential biodiversity variables (EBVs) has been suggested in response to this challenge. The concept has generated much attention, but the EBVs themselves are still in development due to the complexity of the task, the limited resources available, and a lack of long-term commitment to maintain EBV data sets. As a first step, the scientific community and the policy sphere should agree on a set of priority candidate EBVs to be developed within the coming years to advance both large-scale ecological research as well as global and regional biodiversity conservation. Critical ecological transitions are of high importance from both a scientific as well as from a conservation policy point of view, as they can lead to long-lasting biodiversity change with a high potential for deleterious effects on whole ecosystems and therefore also on human well-being. We evaluated candidate EBVs using six criteria: relevance, sensitivity to change, generalizability, scalability, feasibility, and data availability and provide a literature-based review for eight EBVs with high sensitivity to change. The proposed suite of EBVs comprises abundance, allelic diversity, body mass index, ecosystem heterogeneity, phenology, range dynamics, size at first reproduction, and survival rates. The eight candidate EBVs provide for the early detection of critical and potentially long-lasting biodiversity change and should be operationalized as a priority. Only with such an approach can science predict the future status of global biodiversity with high certainty and set up the appropriate conservation measures early and efficiently. Importantly, the selected EBVs would address a large range of conservation issues and contribute to a total of 15 of the 20 Aichi targets and are, hence, of high biological relevance. © 2017 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

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