Exploring or avoiding novel food resources? The novelty conflict in an invasive bird.

Bartomeus I, Sol D, Griffin A (2012) Exploring or avoiding novel food resources? The novelty conflict in an invasive bird. Oral presentation, Animal Behavior Society conference, New Mexico (USA).

Unraveling the life history of successful invaders. Invited seminar.

Sol D (2012) Unraveling the life history of successful invaders. Invited seminar. University of Fribourg (Switzerland) December 18, 2012.

What does make a species a successful invader? .

Sol D (2012) What does make a species a successful invader? Invited speaker, 2012 Margalef Price, Prof. Dr. D. Simberloff. October 31.

Life history, behavioral responses and success in novel environments.

Sol D (2012) Life history, behavioral responses and success in novel environments. Invited speaker, Presidential Symposium on behavior and plasticity at the Animal Behavior Society conference, New Mexico (USA).

Unraveling the life history of successful invaders.

Sol D, Maspons J, Vall-llosera M, Bartomeus I, García-Peña GE, Piñol J, Freckleton RP (2012) Unraveling the life history of successful invaders. Oral presentation, 7th Neobiota International conference, Pontevedra (Spain), 2012.

The effect of bed-hedging on introduced populations.

Maspons J, Sol D (2012) The effect of bed-hedging on introduced populations. Poster, 7th Neobiota International conference, Pontevedra (Spain), 2012.

TEASIng apart alien species risk assessments: A framework for best practices

Leung B., Roura-Pascual N., Bacher S., Heikkilä J., Brotons L., Burgman M.A., Dehnen-Schmutz K., Essl F., Hulme P.E., Richardson D.M., Sol D., Vilà M. (2012) TEASIng apart alien species risk assessments: A framework for best practices. Ecology Letters. 15: 1475-1493.
Link
Doi: 10.1111/ele.12003

Abstract:

Some alien species cause substantial impacts, yet most are innocuous. Given limited resources, forecasting risks from alien species will help prioritise management. Given that risk assessment (RA) approaches vary widely, a synthesis is timely to highlight best practices. We reviewed quantitative and scoring RAs, integrating > 300 publications into arguably the most rigorous quantitative RA framework currently existing, and mapping each study onto our framework, which combines Transport, Establishment, Abundance, Spread and Impact (TEASI). Quantitative models generally measured single risk components (78% of studies), often focusing on Establishment alone (79%). Although dominant in academia, quantitative RAs are underused in policy, and should be made more accessible. Accommodating heterogeneous limited data, combining across risk components, and developing generalised RAs across species, space and time without requiring new models for each species may increase attractiveness for policy applications. Comparatively, scoring approaches covered more risk components (50% examined > 3 components), with Impact being the most common component (87%), and have been widely applied in policy (> 57%), but primarily employed expert opinion. Our framework provides guidance for questions asked, combining scores and other improvements. Our risk framework need not be completely parameterised to be informative, but instead identifies opportunities for improvement in alien species RA. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

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Biotic resistance, niche opportunities and the invasion of natural habitats.

Vall-llosera M, Sol D, Llimona F, de Cáceres M, Sales S (2012) Biotic resistance, niche opportunities and the invasion of natural habitats. Oral presentation, 7th Neobiota International conference, Pontevedra (Spain).

Behavior drives morphological diversification in pigeons and doves.

Lapiedra O, Sol D, Carranza S, Beaulie J (2012) Behavior drives morphological diversification in pigeons and doves. Oral presentation, Animal Behavior Society conference, New Mexico (USA), 2012.

The paradox of invasion in birds: Competitive superiority or ecological opportunism?

Sol D., Bartomeus I., Griffin A.S. (2012) The paradox of invasion in birds: Competitive superiority or ecological opportunism?. Oecologia. 169: 553-564.
Link
Doi: 10.1007/s00442-011-2203-x

Abstract:

Why can alien species succeed in environments to which they have had no opportunity to adapt and even become more abundant than many native species? Ecological theory suggests two main possible answers for this paradox: competitive superiority of exotic species over native species and opportunistic use of ecological opportunities derived from human activities. We tested these hypotheses in birds combining field observations and experiments along gradients of urbanization in New South Wales (Australia). Five exotic species attained densities in the study area comparable to those of the most abundant native species, and hence provided a case for the invasion paradox. The success of these alien birds was not primarily associated with a competitive superiority over native species: the most successful invaders were smaller and less aggressive than their main native competitors, and were generally excluded from artificially created food patches where competition was high. More importantly, exotic birds were primarily restricted to urban environments, where the diversity and abundance of native species were low. This finding agrees with previous studies and indicates that exotic and native species rarely interact in nature. Observations and experiments in the field revealed that the few native species that exploit the most urbanized environments tended to be opportunistic foragers, adaptations that should facilitate survival in places where disturbances by humans are frequent and natural vegetation has been replaced by man-made structures. Successful invaders also shared these features, suggesting that their success is not a paradox but can be explained by their capacity to exploit ecological opportunities that most native species rarely use. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

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