Can current moisture responses predict soil CO2 efflux under altered precipitation regimes? A synthesis of manipulation experiments

Vicca S., Bahn M., Estiarte M., Van Loon E.E., Vargas R., Alberti G., Ambus P., Arain M.A., Beier C., Bentley L.P., Borken W., Buchmann N., Collins S.L., De Dato G., Dukes J.S., Escolar C., Fay P., Guidolotti G., Hanson P.J., Kahmen A., Kröel-Dulay G., Ladreiter-Knauss T., Larsen K.S., Lellei-Kovacs E., Lebrija-Trejos E., Maestre F.T., Marhan S., Marshall M., Meir P., Miao Y., Muhr J., Niklaus P.A., Ogaya R., Peñuelas J., Poll C., Rustad L.E., Savage K., Schindlbacher A., Schmidt I.K., Smith A.R., Sotta E.D., Suseela V., Tietema A., Van Gestel N., Van Straaten O., Wan S., Weber U., Janssens I.A. (2014) Can current moisture responses predict soil CO2 efflux under altered precipitation regimes? A synthesis of manipulation experiments. Biogeosciences. 11: 2991-3013.
Link
Doi: 10.5194/bg-11-2991-2014

Abstract:

As a key component of the carbon cycle, soil CO2 efflux (SCE) is being increasingly studied to improve our mechanistic understanding of this important carbon flux. Predicting ecosystem responses to climate change often depends on extrapolation of current relationships between ecosystem processes and their climatic drivers to conditions not yet experienced by the ecosystem. This raises the question of to what extent these relationships remain unaltered beyond the current climatic window for which observations are available to constrain the relationships. Here, we evaluate whether current responses of SCE to fluctuations in soil temperature and soil water content can be used to predict SCE under altered rainfall patterns. Of the 58 experiments for which we gathered SCE data, 20 were discarded because either too few data were available or inconsistencies precluded their incorporation in the analyses. The 38 remaining experiments were used to test the hypothesis that a model parameterized with data from the control plots (using soil temperature and water content as predictor variables) could adequately predict SCE measured in the manipulated treatment. Only for 7 of these 38 experiments was this hypothesis rejected. Importantly, these were the experiments with the most reliable data sets, i.e., those providing high-frequency measurements of SCE. Regression tree analysis demonstrated that our hypothesis could be rejected only for experiments with measurement intervals of less than 11 days, and was not rejected for any of the 24 experiments with larger measurement intervals. This highlights the importance of high-frequency measurements when studying effects of altered precipitation on SCE, probably because infrequent measurement schemes have insufficient capacity to detect shifts in the climate dependencies of SCE. Hence, the most justified answer to the question of whether current moisture responses of SCE can be extrapolated to predict SCE under altered precipitation regimes is "no" - as based on the most reliable data sets available. We strongly recommend that future experiments focus more strongly on establishing response functions across a broader range of precipitation regimes and soil moisture conditions. Such experiments should make accurate measurements of water availability, should conduct high-frequency SCE measurements, and should consider both instantaneous responses and the potential legacy effects of climate extremes. This is important, because with the novel approach presented here, we demonstrated that, at least for some ecosystems, current moisture responses could not be extrapolated to predict SCE under altered rainfall conditions. © Author(s) 2014.

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Intensive measurements of gas, water, and energy exchange between vegetation and troposphere during the MONTES campaign in a vegetation gradient from short semi-desertic shrublands to tall wet temperate forests in the NW Mediterranean Basin

Penuelas J., Guenther A., Rapparini F., Llusia J., Filella I., Seco R., Estiarte M., Mejia-Chang M., Ogaya R., Ibanez J., Sardans J., Castano L.M., Turnipseed A., Duhl T., Harley P., Vila J., Estavillo J.M., Menendez S., Facini O., Baraldi R., Geron C., Mak J., Patton E.G., Jiang X., Greenberg J. (2013) Intensive measurements of gas, water, and energy exchange between vegetation and troposphere during the MONTES campaign in a vegetation gradient from short semi-desertic shrublands to tall wet temperate forests in the NW Mediterranean Basin. Atmospheric Environment. 75: 348-364.
Link
Doi: 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2013.04.032

Abstract:

MONTES ("Woodlands") was a multidisciplinary international field campaign aimed at measuring energy, water and especially gas exchange between vegetation and atmosphere in a gradient from short semi-desertic shrublands to tall wet temperate forests in NE Spain in the North Western Mediterranean Basin (WMB). The measurements were performed at a semidesertic area (Monegros), at a coastal Mediterranean shrubland area (Garraf), at a typical Mediterranean holm oak forest area (Prades) and at a wet temperate beech forest (Montseny) during spring (April 2010) under optimal plant physiological conditions in driest-warmest sites and during summer (July 2010) with drought and heat stresses in the driest-warmest sites and optimal conditions in the wettest-coolest site. The objective of this campaign was to study the differences in gas, water and energy exchange occurring at different vegetation coverages and biomasses. Particular attention was devoted to quantitatively understand the exchange of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) because of their biological and environmental effects in the WMB. A wide range of instruments (GC-MS, PTR-MS, meteorological sensors, O3 monitors,. .) and vertical platforms such as masts, tethered balloons and aircraft were used to characterize the gas, water and energy exchange at increasing footprint areas by measuring vertical profiles. In this paper we provide an overview of the MONTES campaign: the objectives, the characterization of the biomass and gas, water and energy exchange in the 4 sites-areas using satellite data, the estimation of isoprene and monoterpene emissions using MEGAN model, the measurements performed and the first results. The isoprene and monoterpene emission rates estimated with MEGAN and emission factors measured at the foliar level for the dominant species ranged from about 0 to 0.2mgm-2h-1 in April. The warmer temperature in July resulted in higher model estimates from about 0 to ca. 1.6mgm-2h-1 for isoprene and ca. 4.5mgm-2h-1 for monoterpenes, depending on the site vegetation and footprint area considered. There were clear daily and seasonal patterns with higher emission rates and mixing ratios at midday and summer relative to early morning and early spring. There was a significant trend in CO2 fixation (from 1 to 10mgCm-2d-1), transpiration (from1-5kgCm-2d-1), and sensible and latent heat from the warmest-driest to the coolest-wettest site. The results showed the strong land-cover-specific influence on emissions of BVOCs, gas, energy and water exchange, and therefore demonstrate the potential for feed-back to atmospheric chemistry and climate. •We present a multidisciplinary biosphere-atmosphere field campaign.•We measured a gradient from semi-desertic shrublands to wet temperate forests.•A wide range of instruments and vertical platforms were used.•Land cover strongly influenced emissions of BVOCs and gas, energy and water exchange.•Vegetation has strong potential for feed-back to atmospheric chemistry and climate. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

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Evidence of current impact of climate change on life: A walk from genes to the biosphere

Penuelas J., Sardans J., Estiarte M., Ogaya R., Carnicer J., Coll M., Barbeta A., Rivas-Ubach A., Llusia J., Garbulsky M., Filella I., Jump A.S. (2013) Evidence of current impact of climate change on life: A walk from genes to the biosphere. Global Change Biology. 19: 2303-2338.
Link
Doi: 10.1111/gcb.12143

Abstract:

We review the evidence of how organisms and populations are currently responding to climate change through phenotypic plasticity, genotypic evolution, changes in distribution and, in some cases, local extinction. Organisms alter their gene expression and metabolism to increase the concentrations of several antistress compounds and to change their physiology, phenology, growth and reproduction in response to climate change. Rapid adaptation and microevolution occur at the population level. Together with these phenotypic and genotypic adaptations, the movement of organisms and the turnover of populations can lead to migration toward habitats with better conditions unless hindered by barriers. Both migration and local extinction of populations have occurred. However, many unknowns for all these processes remain. The roles of phenotypic plasticity and genotypic evolution and their possible trade-offs and links with population structure warrant further research. The application of omic techniques to ecological studies will greatly favor this research. It remains poorly understood how climate change will result in asymmetrical responses of species and how it will interact with other increasing global impacts, such as N eutrophication, changes in environmental N : P ratios and species invasion, among many others. The biogeochemical and biophysical feedbacks on climate of all these changes in vegetation are also poorly understood. We here review the evidence of responses to climate change and discuss the perspectives for increasing our knowledge of the interactions between climate change and life. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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Field-simulated droughts affect elemental leaf stoichiometry in Mediterranean forests and shrublands

Sardans J., Rivas-Ubach A., Estiarte M., Ogaya R., Penuelas J. (2013) Field-simulated droughts affect elemental leaf stoichiometry in Mediterranean forests and shrublands. Acta Oecologica. 50: 20-31.
Link
Doi: 10.1016/j.actao.2013.04.002

Abstract:

This study evaluated the change induced by the year season and by experimentally induced drought on foliar element stoichiometry of the predominant woody species (. Quercus ilex and Erica multiflora) in two Mediterranean ecosystems, a forest and a shrubland. This study is based in two long-term (11yr) field experiments that simulated drought throughout the annual cycle.The effects of experimental droughts were significant but weaker than the changes produced by ontogeny and seasonality. Leaf N and P concentrations were higher in spring (the main growing season) in E. multiflora and, in Q.ilex in autumn (a period of additional growth). Leaf N:P ratios were lower in spring. In Q.ilex, the highest leaf K concentrations and leaf K:P ratios, and the lowest leaf C:K and N:K ratios, occurred in summer, the season when water stress was greatest. In E.multiflora, leaf K concentrations and K:P ratios were highest, and leaf C:K and N:K ratios were lowest in the plants from the drought-treated plots.The plant capacity to change K concentrations in response to seasonality and to drought is at least as great as the capacity to change N and P concentrations. The results underscore the importance of K and its stoichiometry relative to C, N and P in dry environments. These results indicate first, that N:P ratio shifts are not uniquely related to growth rate in Mediterranean plants but also to drought, and second, that there is a need to take into account K in ecological stoichiometry studies of terrestrial plants. © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS.

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Inter-annual variability of seed rain and seedling establishment of two woody Mediterranean species under field-induced drought and warming

del Cacho M., Estiarte M., Peñuelas J., Lloret F. (2013) Inter-annual variability of seed rain and seedling establishment of two woody Mediterranean species under field-induced drought and warming. Population Ecology. 55: 277-289.
Link
Doi: 10.1007/s10144-013-0365-6

Abstract:

We aimed to assess the impact of warmer and drier climate change conditions on the seed rain and seedling establishment of Globularia alypum L. and Erica multiflora L., two dominant species in Western coastal Mediterranean shrublands. We performed a non-intrusive field experiment in which we increased the night-time temperatures and excluded spring and autumn rainfall. We monitored the seed rain over 5 years and the seedling recruitment over 9 years on these experimental plots. Seed rain of E. multiflora was enhanced by warming treatment in relation to control, and higher annual rainfall, while seed rain of G. alypum was increased by drought treatment in relation to control, dry years and higher minimum annual temperature. Annual rainfall enhanced the seedling emergence of both species, which also positively correlated with annual mean temperatures. Drought treatment significantly decreased seedling emergence for both species, which was higher in open areas than below vegetation cover. The seedling survival of both species diminished at closer distances to competing neighbours, and in G. alypum seedling survival was higher with lower annual mean temperatures and higher annual rainfall, but also in drought treatment, which have experienced vegetation cover decline. The study confirms that the increasing aridity in Mediterranean ecosystems would constrain the early stages of development in typical co-occurring shrubs. However, there are contrasting responses to climatic conditions between species recruitment, which might favour changes in vegetation through modification of species relative abundance. © 2013 The Society of Population Ecology and Springer Japan.

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Una nova ciència per entendre els ecosistemes: l'ecometabolòmica.

Rivas-Ubach A, Sardans J, Pérez-Trujillo M, Estiarte M, Peñuelas J (2012) Una nova ciència per entendre els ecosistemes: l'ecometabolòmica. Omnis Cellula 28: 5.

Strong relationship between elemental stoichiometry and metabolome in plants

Rivas-Ubach A, Sardans J, Pérez-Trujillo M, Estiarte M, Peñuelas J (2012) Strong relationship between elemental stoichiometry and metabolome in plants. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciencies 109: 4181-4186.

Synthesizing greenhouse gas fluxes across nine European peatlands and shrublands-responses to climatic and environmental changes

Carter M.S., Larsen K.S., Emmett B., Estiarte M., Field C., Leith I.D., Lund M., Meijide A., Mills R.T.E., Niinemets Ü., Penuelas J., Portillo-Estrada M., Schmidt I.K., Selsted M.B., Sheppard L.J., Sowerby A., Tietema A., Beier C. (2012) Synthesizing greenhouse gas fluxes across nine European peatlands and shrublands-responses to climatic and environmental changes. Biogeosciences. 9: 3739-3755.
Link
Doi: 10.5194/bg-9-3739-2012

Abstract:

In this study, we compare annual fluxes of methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and soil respiratory carbon dioxide (CO 2) measured at nine European peatlands (n=4) and shrublands (n=5). The sites range from northern Sweden to Spain, covering a span in mean annual air temperature from 0 to 16 °C, and in annual precipitation from 300 to 1300 mm yr.-1. The effects of climate change, including temperature increase and prolonged drought, were tested at five shrubland sites. At one peatland site, the long-term (> 30 yr) effect of drainage was assessed, while increased nitrogen deposition was investigated at three peatland sites. The shrublands were generally sinks for atmospheric CH4, whereas the peatlands were CH4 sources, with fluxes ranging from-519 to +6890 mg CH4-C mg-2 yr-1 across the studied ecosystems. At the peatland sites, annual CH4 emission increased with mean annual air temperature, while a negative relationship was found between net CH4 uptake and the soil carbon stock at the shrubland sites. Annual N2O fluxes were generally small ranging from ĝ̂'14 to 42 mg N 2O-N m-2 yr-1. Highest N2O emission occurred at the sites that had highest nitrate (NO3ĝ̂') concentration in the soil water. Furthermore, experimentally increased NO3ĝ̂' deposition led to increased N2O efflux, whereas prolonged drought and long-term drainage reduced the N2O efflux. Soil CO2 emissions in control plots ranged from 310 to 732 g CO2-C m-2 yr -1. Drought and long-term drainage generally reduced the soil CO 2 efflux, except at a hydric shrubland where drought tended to increase soil respiration. In terms of fractional importance of each greenhouse gas to the total numerical global warming response, the change in CO2 efflux dominated the response in all treatments (ranging 71-96%), except for NO3 addition where 89% was due to change in CH4 emissions. Thus, in European peatlands and shrublands the effect on global warming induced by the investigated anthropogenic disturbances will be dominated by variations in soil CO2 fluxes. © 2012 Author(s).

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Second report on climate change in Catalonia

Llebot JE, Carnicer J, Curiel J, Coll M, Díaz de Quijano M, Estiarte M, Filella I, Garbulsky M, Jump A, Llusià J, Ogaya R, Peñuelas J, Rico L, Rivas-Ubach A, Rutishauser T, Sardans J, Seco R, Silva J, Stefanescu C, Terradas J (2012) Second report on climate change in Catalonia. Executive summary. Institut d'Estudis Catalans. Generalitat de Catalunya. pp. 1-36. ISBN9788499650975.

BVOCs in the plant-pollinator market and other applications of ecology to betytyerunderstand BVOC emissions in the environment.

Peñuelas J, Filella I, Farré G, Owen S, Primante C, Rodrigo A, Martín A, Bosch J, Seco R, Porcar A, Llusià J, Greenberg J, Harley P, Rapparini F, Estiarte M, Mejia-Chang M, Ogaya R, Ibañez J, Sardans J, Turnipseed A, Geron C, Duhl T, Facini O, Baraldi R, Rapparini F, Guenther A (2012) BVOCs in the plant-pollinator market and other applications of ecology to betytyerunderstand BVOC emissions in the environment. BVOCs Gordon Conference, Biogenic Hydrocarbons & the atmosphere. Reaching across scales: from molecule to the globe. Bates College, Maine. June 24-29. Key note invited speaker.

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