Chemical cues involved in the attraction of the oligolectic bee Hoplitis adunca to its host plant Echium vulgare

Filella I., Bosch J., Llusià J., Peñuelas A., Peñuelas J. (2011) Chemical cues involved in the attraction of the oligolectic bee Hoplitis adunca to its host plant Echium vulgare. Biochemical Systematics and Ecology. 39: 498-508.
Link
Doi: 10.1016/j.bse.2011.07.008

Abstract:

Host recognition is a key process in oligolectic bees but the mechanisms through which they find and recognize appropriate pollen host plant are not entirely clear. Hoplitis adunca is a monolectic bee collecting pollen only from Echium spp. (Boraginaceae). We aimed to test whether Echium vulgare floral scent plays a major role in the attraction of H. adunca females, and to identify components of E. vulgare scent that may be involved in this specific attraction. We used a combination of behavioral and chemical (GC/GC-MS, PTR-MS) analyses. In order to identify the chemical cues likely to be involved in the specific attraction of H. adunca, we compared the scent of fresh flowers, nectar, pollen, and whole plants of E. vulgare and Anchusa officinalis, another Boraginaceae, which does not attract H. adunca. H. adunca females were attracted to the scent of E. vulgare flowers when offered against a blank or against the scent of A. officinalis flowers. However, H. adunca females were not attracted to the scent of A. officinalis flowers when offered against a blank. The emission spectra of the two plant species differed markedly, as did the emission spectra of various flower components (pollen, nectar and whole flowers) within a species. Pollen presented a low volatile release, but emitted significantly higher amounts of mass 55 (butanal, 1,3-butadiene, or other volatiles of molecular mass 54), and mass 83 (hexanal, hexenols, hexenyl acetate, or other volatiles of molecular mass 82) in E. vulgare than in A. officinalis. Nectar produced a particular emission spectrum with high emission rates of masses 109 and 123. Mass 109 may likely correspond to 1,4-benzoquinone, a volatile specifically measured in E. vulgare in parallel studies to this one. The flower emission spectrum was mainly a combination of the pollen and the nectar scents, although it also contained additional volatile compounds such as those of mass 63 or mass 81. As for terpenes, E. vulgare emitted limonene, longicyclene, junipene, trans-caryophyllene and α-humulene, that were not detected in A. officinalis, and the most emitted monoterpenes were α-pinene, junipene and limonene whereas the most emitted terpenoid by A. officinalis was α-pinene. After identifying these chemical cues, olfactory/behavioural assays with specific volatiles and combinations of volatiles are necessary to understand the chemical interactions of the H. adunca-E. vulgare system. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

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The role of frass and cocoon volatiles in host location by monodontomerus aeneus, a parasitoid of megachilid solitary bees

Filella I., Bosch J., Llusiá J., Seco R., Peñuelas J. (2011) The role of frass and cocoon volatiles in host location by monodontomerus aeneus, a parasitoid of megachilid solitary bees. Environmental Entomology. 40: 126-131.
Link
Doi: 10.1603/EN10165

Abstract:

Monodontomerus aeneus (Fonscolombe) is a parasitic wasp that oviposits on the prepupae and pupae of Osmia cornuta (Latreille) and other solitary bee species. A two-armed olfactometer was used to test the olfactory attractiveness of O. cornuta prepupae, cocoon, and larval frass to female M. aeneus. Both cocoon and frass attracted the female parasitoids, but frass alone was more attractive than the cocoon and the cocoon with frass was more attractive than frass alone. Female parasitoids were not attracted by the host prepupa. M33 (methanol) was the organic volatile most emitted by cocoons and m61 (acetic acid) was the compound most emitted by frass. However, cocoons showed higher emission for almost all compounds, including m61 (acetic acid). Although acetic acid alone attracted M. aeneus, a complex volatile signal is probably involved in the attraction process because the ratio of acetic acid and acetaldehyde characteristic of the frass was more attractive than other ratios. © 2011 Entomological Society of America.

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Responses to low increase in UV radiation on Volatile terpene emission rates, photosynthetic rates and Stomatal conductance in four Mediterranean species.

Llusià J, Peñuelas J, Llorens L (2011) Responses to low increase in UV radiation on Volatile terpene emission rates, photosynthetic rates and Stomatal conductance in four Mediterranean species. Acta Physiologiae Plantarum doi: 10.1007/s11738-011-0876-8.

Instantaneous and historical temperature effects on a-pinene emissions in Pinus halepensis and Quercus ilex.

Blanc JS, Llusià J, Niinemets Ü, Noe SM, Peñuelas J (2011) Instantaneous and historical temperature effects on a-pinene emissions in Pinus halepensis and Quercus ilex. Journal of Environmental Biology 32: 1-6.

The world's largest database on wild plants is published.

Sardans J, Peñuelas J, Estiarte M, Ogaya R, Llusià J (2011) The world's largest database on wild plants is published. UABdivulga 09/2011.

Llebot E. (ed). Impactes, vulnerabilitat i retroalimentacions climàtiques als ecosistemes terrestres catalans. Segon informe sobre el canvi climàtic a Catalunya.

Peñuelas J, Filella I, Estiarte M, Ogaya R, Llusià J, Sardans J, Jump A, Curiel J, Carnicer J, Rutishauser T, Rico L, Keenan T, Garbulsky M, Coll M, Diaz de Quijano M, Seco R, Rivas-Ubach A, Silva J, Boada M, Stefanescu C, Lloret F, Terradas J (2011) Llebot E. (ed). Impactes, vulnerabilitat i retroalimentacions climàtiques als ecosistemes terrestres catalans. Segon informe sobre el canvi climàtic a Catalunya. Institut d'Estudis Catalans i Generalitat de Catalunya. Barcelona, pp. 373-407.

TRY - a global database of plant traits

Kattge J., Diaz S., Lavorel S., Prentice I.C., Leadley P., Bonisch G., Garnier E., Westoby M., Reich P.B., Wright I.J., Cornelissen J.H.C., Violle C., Harrison S.P., Van Bodegom P.M., Reichstein M., Enquist B.J., Soudzilovskaia N.A., Ackerly D.D., Anand M., Atkin O., Bahn M., Baker T.R., Baldocchi D., Bekker R., Blanco C.C., Blonder B., Bond W.J., Bradstock R., Bunker D.E., Casanoves F., Cavender-Bares J., Chambers J.Q., Chapin F.S., Chave J., Coomes D., Cornwell W.K., Craine J.M., Dobrin B.H., Duarte L., Durka W., Elser J., Esser G., Estiarte M., Fagan W.F., Fang J., Fernandez-Mendez F., Fidelis A., Finegan B., Flores O., Ford H., Frank D., Freschet G.T., Fyllas N.M., Gallagher R.V., Green W.A., Gutierrez A.G., Hickler T., Higgins S.I., Hodgson J.G., Jalili A., Jansen S., Joly C.A., Kerkhoff A.J., Kirkup D., Kitajima K., Kleyer M., Klotz S., Knops J.M.H., Kramer K., Kuhn I., Kurokawa H., Laughlin D., Lee T.D., Leishman M., Lens F., Lenz T., Lewis S.L., Lloyd J., Llusia J., Louault F., Ma S., Mahecha M.D., Manning P., Massad T., Medlyn B.E., Messier J., Moles A.T., Muller S.C., Nadrowski K., Naeem S., Niinemets U., Nollert S., Nuske A., Ogaya R., Oleksyn J., Onipchenko V.G., Onoda Y., Ordonez J., Overbeck G., Ozinga W.A., Patino S., Paula S., Pausas J.G., Penuelas J., Phillips O.L., Pillar V., Poorter H., Poorter L., Poschlod P., Prinzing A., Proulx R., Rammig A., Reinsch S., Reu B., Sack L., Salgado-Negret B., Sardans J., Shiodera S., Shipley B., Siefert A., Sosinski E., Soussana J.-F., Swaine E., Swenson N., Thompson K., Thornton P., Waldram M., Weiher E., White M., White S., Wright S.J., Yguel B., Zaehle S., Zanne A.E., Wirth C. (2011) TRY - a global database of plant traits. Global Change Biology. 17: 2905-2935.
Link
Doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2486.2011.02451.x

Abstract:

Plant traits - the morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochemical and phenological characteristics of plants and their organs - determine how primary producers respond to environmental factors, affect other trophic levels, influence ecosystem processes and services and provide a link from species richness to ecosystem functional diversity. Trait data thus represent the raw material for a wide range of research from evolutionary biology, community and functional ecology to biogeography. Here we present the global database initiative named TRY, which has united a wide range of the plant trait research community worldwide and gained an unprecedented buy-in of trait data: so far 93 trait databases have been contributed. The data repository currently contains almost three million trait entries for 69000 out of the world's 300000 plant species, with a focus on 52 groups of traits characterizing the vegetative and regeneration stages of the plant life cycle, including growth, dispersal, establishment and persistence. A first data analysis shows that most plant traits are approximately log-normally distributed, with widely differing ranges of variation across traits. Most trait variation is between species (interspecific), but significant intraspecific variation is also documented, up to 40% of the overall variation. Plant functional types (PFTs), as commonly used in vegetation models, capture a substantial fraction of the observed variation - but for several traits most variation occurs within PFTs, up to 75% of the overall variation. In the context of vegetation models these traits would better be represented by state variables rather than fixed parameter values. The improved availability of plant trait data in the unified global database is expected to support a paradigm shift from species to trait-based ecology, offer new opportunities for synthetic plant trait research and enable a more realistic and empirically grounded representation of terrestrial vegetation in Earth system models. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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Species-specific, seasonal, inter-annual, and historically-accumulated changes in foliar terpene emission rates in Phillyrea latifolia and Quercus ilex submitted to rain exclusion in the Prades Mountains (Catalonia)

Llusià J., Peñuelas J., Alessio G.A., Ogaya R. (2011) Species-specific, seasonal, inter-annual, and historically-accumulated changes in foliar terpene emission rates in Phillyrea latifolia and Quercus ilex submitted to rain exclusion in the Prades Mountains (Catalonia). Russian Journal of Plant Physiology. 58: 126-132.
Link
Doi: 10.1134/S1021443710061020

Abstract:

Mediterranean vegetation emits large amounts of terpenes. We aimed to study the effects of the decreases in soil water availability forecast for the next decades by global circulation models and ecophysiological models on the terpene emissions by two widely distributed Mediterranean woody species, Phillyrea latifolia L. and Quercus ilex L. We subjected holm oak forest plots to an experimental soil drought of ca. 20% decrease in soil moisture by partial rainfall exclusion and runoff exclusion. We measured the emission rates throughout the seasons for two years with contrasting precipitation and soil moisture (16.6% average in 2003 vs. 6.4% as average in 2005). Among the detected volatile terpenes, only α-pinene and limonene were present in detectable quantities in all of the studied periods. Total terpene emitted ranged from practically zero (spring 2003) to 3.6 and 58.3 μg/(g dry wt h) (winter 2005 and summer 2003 for P. latifolia and Q. ilex, respectively). A clear seasonality was found in the emission rates (they were the highest in summer in both species) and also in the qualitative composition of the emission mix. Maximum emissions of α-pinene occurred in spring and maximum emissions of limonene in winter. Neither the inter-annual differences in water availability nor the rain exclusion treatment significantly affected the emissions in P. latifolia, but Q. ilex showed by 17% lower emissions during the drier second year of study, 2005, but more than two- and threefold increases with the drought treatment in summer 2003 and in summer 2005, respectively, showing historical accumulated effects. These results, which show increased monoterpene emission under the moderate drought produced by the treatment and decreased emission under the severe second year drought, and a much higher sensitivity to drought in Q. ilex than in P. latifolia, are useful in understanding the behavior of plant volatiles under Mediterranean conditions and in modeling future emission under changing climate conditions. They show that the usage of current models could lead to under- and overestimations of the emission under summer dry conditions, because most current algorithms are based on light and temperature only. © 2011 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.

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Chlorophyll fluorescence responses to temperature and water availability in two co-dominant Mediterranean shrub and tree species in a long-term field experiment simulating climate change

Ogaya R., Peñuelas J., Asensio D., Llusià J. (2011) Chlorophyll fluorescence responses to temperature and water availability in two co-dominant Mediterranean shrub and tree species in a long-term field experiment simulating climate change. Environmental and Experimental Botany. 73: 89-93.
Link
Doi: 10.1016/j.envexpbot.2011.08.004

Abstract:

A rain exclusion experiment simulating drought conditions expected in Mediterranean areas for the following decades (15% decrease in soil moisture) is being conducted since 1999 in a Mediterranean holm oak forest to study its response to the forecasted climatic changes for the coming decades. The maximum PSII quantum yield of primary photochemistry (Fv/Fm) was measured in Quercus ilex, and Phillyrea latifolia, the co-dominant species of the studied forest, from 1999 to 2009 in four plots: two of them were control plots and the other two plots received the rain exclusion treatment. In both species, the Fv/Fm values were highly dependent on air temperatures, and in a second term, in water availability. P. latifolia was the species with the larger decrease in Fv/Fm values induced by low air temperatures, while in hot seasons, the Fv/Fm values in P. latifolia were even higher than in Q. ilex. Rainfall exclusion decrease Fv/Fm values significantly only in few monitoring dates. The most drought resistant species P. latifolia was more affected by the experimental rainfall exclusion than Q. ilex that instead lost number of leaves per tree. There was a synergic effect of drought stress and winter cold in P. latifolia not observed in Q. ilex, but a more conservative strategy in P. latifolia maintaining leaves with a down-regulation of the linear photosynthetic electron transport. These results indicate that, although other physiological and reproductive strategies at whole plant level must be also taken into account, the warmer and drier environment expected for the following decades could favour the species more sensitive to cold and more resistant to drought, the shrub P. latifolia, in detriment of the tree Q. ilex as already observed in the field after severe heat-drought episodes. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

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Chlorophyll fluorescence responses to temperature and water availability in two co-dominant Mediterranean shrub and tree species in a long-term field experiment simulating climate change

Ogaya R., Peñuelas J., Asensio D., Llusià J. (2011) Chlorophyll fluorescence responses to temperature and water availability in two co-dominant Mediterranean shrub and tree species in a long-term field experiment simulating climate change. Environmental and Experimental Botany. 71: 123-127.
Link
Doi: 10.1016/j.envexpbot.2010.10.016

Abstract:

A rain exclusion experiment simulating drought conditions expected in Mediterranean areas for the following decades (15% decrease in soil moisture) is being conducted since 1999 in a Mediterranean holm oak forest to study its response to the forecasted climatic changes for the coming decades. The maximum PSII quantum yield of primary photochemistry (Fv/Fm) was measured in Quercus ilex, and Phillyrea latifolia, the co-dominant species of the studied forest, from 1999 to 2009 in four plots: two of them were control plots and the other two plots received the rain exclusion treatment. In both species, the Fv/Fm values were highly dependent on air temperatures, and in a second term, in water availability. P. latifolia was the species with the larger decrease in Fv/Fm values induced by low air temperatures, while in hot seasons, the Fv/Fm values in P. latifolia were even higher than in Q. ilex. Rainfall exclusion decrease Fv/Fm values significantly only in few monitoring dates. The most drought resistant species P. latifolia was more affected by the experimental rainfall exclusion than Q. ilex that instead lost number of leaves per tree. There was a synergic effect of drought stress and winter cold in P. latifolia not observed in Q. ilex, but a more conservative strategy in P. latifolia maintaining leaves with a down-regulation of the linear photosynthetic electron transport. These results indicate that, although other physiological and reproductive strategies at whole plant level must be also taken into account, the warmer and drier environment expected for the following decades could favour the species more sensitive to cold and more resistant to drought, the shrub P. latifolia, in detriment of the tree Q. ilex as already observed in the field after severe heat-drought episodes. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

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