Effects of repeated burning on Mediterranean communities of the northeastern Iberian Peninsula

Eugenio M., Lloret F. (2006) Effects of repeated burning on Mediterranean communities of the northeastern Iberian Peninsula. Journal of Vegetation Science. 17: 755-764.
Link
Doi: 10.1658/1100-9233(2006)17[755:EORBOM]2.0.CO;2

Abstract:

Question: In relation to a single fire, do repeated wildfires in Mediterranean type ecosystems (1) reduce plant species richness or diversity; (2) modify patterns of abundance or dominance of plant species or (3) alter plant composition? Location: Pinus halepensis dominated communities of Catalonia, northeastern Iberian Peninsula, western Mediterranean Basin. Methods: Regional, paired design with 14 study sites, each consisting of a once burnt area (1994) and a twice burnt area (1975-1993 and 1994). Ten years after the last fire, we recorded all vascular plant species present in nested plots and quantified their relative abundances on transects. We compared species richness, diversity, dominance and relative abundance and species-area correlations between paired once and twice burnt areas and assessed their floristic composition similarity. Results: No statistically significant differences were found in species richness or diversity. Slopes of species-area correlations were higher in once burnt areas. In twice burnt areas, dominance by one or two species was higher. P. halepensis showed lower relative abundance and nanophanerophytes showed higher relative abundance. No differences were found for resprouter, seeder or resprouter-seeder species. Floristic composition similarity between paired areas tended to be higher in less productive sites. Conclusions: Fire recurrence had contrasting effects on species richness at different spatial scales. Repeated burning reduced the relative abundance of the dominant tree species, which resulted in a higher relative abundance of shrubs. It also promoted the dominance of herbs, particularly Brachypodium retusum. However, it did not change the relative abundance of regenerative groups. Paired areas were more similar as they were more Mediterranean in terms of climatic conditions. © IAVS; Opulus Press.

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Regional patterns of fire recurrence effects on calcareous soils of Mediterranean Pinus halepensis communities

Eugenio M., Lloret F., Alcañiz J.M. (2006) Regional patterns of fire recurrence effects on calcareous soils of Mediterranean Pinus halepensis communities. Forest Ecology and Management. 221: 313-318.
Link
Doi: 10.1016/j.foreco.2005.10.011

Abstract:

The effects of fire recurrence on soils were studied on calcareous sites of Mediterranean Pinus halepensis-dominated communities in Catalonia (NE Iberian Peninsula). Soil organic horizons and mineral soils of 15 sites consisting in two adjacent areas, one burnt only once (in 1994) and the other burnt twice (in the same 1994 fire but also once before, from 1975 to 1993) were surveyed 9 years after the last fire. Fire recurrence decreased the occurrence and dry mass of soil organic horizons. Total nitrogen concentration in L organic horizon was higher in less recurrently burnt areas. No other significant difference between once- and twice-burnt areas was found for any studied chemical parameter either in organic L and FH horizons or in mineral soils. The present study underlines the fact that fire effects on soil organic horizons are accumulated through consecutive fires. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Els incendis forestals a Catalunya de principi del segle XX a partir de fons periodístiques.

Lloret F, Bendinelli I. (2006) Els incendis forestals a Catalunya de principi del segle XX a partir de fons periodístiques. Orsis 21: 83-91

Recruitment and growth decline in Pinus halepensis populations after recurrent wildfires in Catalonia (NE Iberian Peninsula).

Eugenio M, Verkaik I, Lloret F, Espelta J.M. (2006) Recruitment and growth decline in Pinus halepensis populations after recurrent wildfires in Catalonia (NE Iberian Peninsula). Forest Ecology and Management 231: 47-54

Simulating the effects of different disturbance regimes on Cortaderia selloana invasion

Pausas J.G., Lloret F., Vilà M. (2006) Simulating the effects of different disturbance regimes on Cortaderia selloana invasion. Biological Conservation. 128: 128-135.
Link
Doi: 10.1016/j.biocon.2005.09.022

Abstract:

Disturbances favour plant invasions because they provide a pulse of resources for seedling establishment and growth. However, little attention has been paid to the importance of the different disturbance regimes in the extent of invasion. In this paper we asked to what extent invasion depends on spatial and temporal patterns of disturbance. By using the spatially explicit model Fateland, we simulated how Cortaderia selloana, a large-wind dispersed perennial grass invading Mediterranean grasslands, responds to different medium-term (up to 55 years) disturbance regimes. The different scenarios combine disturbance frequency, extent of disturbance and temporal and spatial disturbance variability, and they roughly mimic real situations of habitat management and disturbances in cultural landscapes. The model predicted that the proportion of invaded area would increase with disturbance frequency. The extent of the disturbance overcame the importance of frequency. Aggregated disturbances randomly distributed in space had a more positive effect on invasion than scattered disturbances at repeatedly fixed locations. Whether the disturbances regularly occurred in time or were irregularly distributed did not influence the percentage of invaded landscape. Our simulation analysis unambiguously supports the hypothesis that disturbances are essential for the persistence and expansion of Cortaderia sellona. The high amount of seed rain from a few individuals (e.g., gardens) make this species very sensitive to landscape changes produced by different disturbance patterns (e.g., land abandonment, habitat management or rubbish dumping). Our results can contribute to redirect land management options. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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