Using fire to promote biodiversity

Kelly, L.T., Brotons, L. (2017) Using fire to promote biodiversity. Science. 355: 1264-1265.
Link
Doi: 10.1126/science.aam7672

Abstract:

Geographical variation in reproductive investment across avian assemblages in Europe: Effects of environmental drivers differ between altricial and precocial species

Kopsová-Storchová L., Storch D., Brotons L., Hořák D. (2017) Geographical variation in reproductive investment across avian assemblages in Europe: Effects of environmental drivers differ between altricial and precocial species. Journal of Avian Biology. : 0-0.
Link
Doi: 10.1111/jav.01131

Abstract:

Reproductive traits provide information about the ways by which available resources are allocated during breeding. We tested for environmental drivers of large scale geographical patterns in assemblage mean clutch size, number of broods and overall reproductive investment per breeding season in European birds. We combined data about geographical distribution with published information about reproductive traits, and calculated mean trait values for avian assemblages occurring in 50 × 50 km grid cells. In total, we employed data from 499 species and 2059 assemblages. As the time available for breeding and the amount of food limit the reproductive effort, we related the geographical variation in reproductive traits to the length of breeding season, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) as a surrogate of resource availability, and its seasonality. Geographical patterns in traits may differ between reproductive modes, thus we performed the analyses separately for altricial Passerines (n = 203) and precocial non-passerine species (n = 164) and controlled for the effect of taxonomy. Large clutches dominated in areas with high NDVI and, in precocial birds, also in areas with high annual seasonality and a long breeding season. High number of broods and high overall reproductive investment dominated in areas with a long breeding season, and high number of broods was found also in areas with low annual seasonality, but only in precocial species. High overall reproductive investment dominated in highly productive areas and also in areas with low annual seasonality in both groups. The increase in reproductive investment is caused mostly by an increase in the number of broods related to the length of season and partly by increase in clutch size related to NDVI. We found a negative correlation between clutch size and the number of broods in Passerines, which might suggest a trade-off between these traits. Processes behind trait patterns differ between altricial and precocial species. © 2017 Nordic Society Oikos.

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Phenological responses of Icelandic subarctic grasslands to short-term and long-term natural soil warming

Leblans, N.I.W., Sigurdsson, B.D., Vicca, S., Fu, Y., Penuelas, J., Janssens, I.A. (2017) Phenological responses of Icelandic subarctic grasslands to short-term and long-term natural soil warming. Global Change Biology. : 0-0.
Link
Doi: 10.1111/gcb.13749

Abstract:

Invasive species’ leaf traits and dissimilarity from natives shape their impact on nitrogen cycling: a meta-analysis

Lee, M.R., Bernhardt, E.S., van Bodegom, P.M., Cornelissen, J.H.C., Kattge, J., Laughlin, D.C., Niinemets, Ü., Peñuelas, J., Reich, P.B., Yguel, B., Wright, J.P. (2017) Invasive species’ leaf traits and dissimilarity from natives shape their impact on nitrogen cycling: a meta-analysis. New Phytologist. 213: 128-139.
Link
Doi: 10.1111/nph.14115

Abstract:

Shift in community structure in an early-successional Mediterranean shrubland driven by long-term experimental warming and drought and natural extreme droughts

Liu, D., Estiarte, M., Ogaya, R., Yang, X., Peñuelas, J. (2017) Shift in community structure in an early-successional Mediterranean shrubland driven by long-term experimental warming and drought and natural extreme droughts. Global Change Biology. : 0-0.
Link
Doi: 10.1111/gcb.13763

Abstract:

Taphonomic signature of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) on bone prey remains

Lloveras L., Cosso A., Solé J., Claramunt-López B., Nadal J. (2017) Taphonomic signature of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) on bone prey remains. Historical Biology. : 1-20.
Link
Doi: 10.1080/08912963.2017.1319830

Abstract:

The golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) is one of the most important birds of prey in the Northern Hemisphere. This raptor is used to building large nests in high cliffs to which they return for several breeding years accumulating important amounts of their prey skeletal remains. This makes the golden eagle one of the major predators able to accumulate faunal remains in archaeological sites. Despite this fact, the taphonomic signature of golden eagles has not been properly characterized. Here we present the analysis of ingested and non-ingested faunal remains predated and accumulated by this raptor in two different nesting areas from the Iberian Peninsula. Results show how the faunal taxonomic record may vary depending on the ecological zone. Leporids and terrestrial carnivores are the best represented. The observed anatomical representation, breakage and bone surface modification patterns are discussed for different taxa. The taphonomic pattern varies depending on the type of prey and the origin of skeletal materials (non-ingested vs. pellets). Finally, after comparing our results with marks left by other predators, several characteristic features are noted to recognise golden eagles as agents of animal bones accumulations in the fossil record. © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

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Carbon and nitrogen allocation shifts in plants and soils along aridity and fertility gradients in grasslands of China

Luo, W., Li, M.-H., Sardans, J., Lü, X.-T., Wang, C., Peñuelas, J., Wang, Z., Han, X.-G., Jiang, Y. (2017) Carbon and nitrogen allocation shifts in plants and soils along aridity and fertility gradients in grasslands of China. Ecology and Evolution. : 0-0.
Link
Doi: 10.1002/ece3.3245

Abstract:

Continuity and change in hunting behaviour among contemporary indigenous peoples

Luz, A.C., Paneque-Gálvez, J., Guèze, M., Pino, J., Macía, M.J., Orta-Martínez, M., Reyes-García, V. (2017) Continuity and change in hunting behaviour among contemporary indigenous peoples. Biological Conservation. 209: 17-26.
Link
Doi: 10.1016/j.biocon.2017.02.002

Abstract:

Temperature fine-tunes Mediterranean Arabidopsis thaliana life-cycle phenology geographically

Marcer, A., Vidigal, D.S., James, P.M.A., Fortin, M.-J., Méndez-Vigo, B., Hilhorst, H.W.M., Bentsink, L., Alonso-Blanco, C., Picó, F.X. (2017) Temperature fine-tunes Mediterranean Arabidopsis thaliana life-cycle phenology geographically. Plant Biology. : 0-0.
Link
Doi: 10.1111/plb.12558

Abstract:

Can mobile phone-based animated videos induce learning and technology adoption among low-literate farmers? A field experiment in Burkina Faso

Maredia M.K., Reyes B., Ba M.N., Dabire C.L., Pittendrigh B., Bello-Bravo J. (2017) Can mobile phone-based animated videos induce learning and technology adoption among low-literate farmers? A field experiment in Burkina Faso. Information Technology for Development. : 1-32.
Link
Doi: 10.1080/02681102.2017.1312245

Abstract:

This article explores an innovative approach to deliver information about new agricultural technology that combines a versatile and potentially lower cost method of developing animated videos with another low-cost method of sharing it on mobile devices (i.e. mobile phone). It describes a randomized controlled field experiment conducted in Burkina Faso to evaluate the effectiveness of animated videos shown on mobile phone compared with the traditional extension method (live demonstration) in inducing learning and adoption of two post-harvest technologies among low-literate farmers. Results suggest that video-based training was as effective as the traditional method in inducing learning and understanding. For technologies that farmers were already aware of animated video shown on the mobile phone was also as effective as live demonstration in inducing adoption. However, in transferring new technologies, the traditional method was more effective in inducing adoption at p 

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