Rapid changes in butterfly communities following the abandonment of grasslands: A case study

Stefanescu C., Peñuelas J., Filella I. (2009) Rapid changes in butterfly communities following the abandonment of grasslands: A case study. Insect Conservation and Diversity. 2: 261-269.
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Doi: 10.1111/j.1752-4598.2009.00063.x

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1. Abandonment of grasslands is a major threat for the conservation of biodiversity in Europe. The response of butterflies towards secondary succession has been studied in northern temperate grasslands, but always by comparing sites at different stages. 2. Here, we present a trajectory study based on the monitoring of butterflies from a series of abandoned grasslands in northeast Spain. One additional meadow was traditionally managed for the whole 8-year sampling period and provided a useful control. Both general changes at the community level and species population trends were documented through standardised transect counts. 3. The increase in turf height was neither accompanied by an increase in butterfly diversity nor by consistent trends in body size, dispersal ability and host-plant specialization. However, there was a significant decrease in habitat specialization, consistent with the hypothesis that richness in generalist herbivores is more dependent on biomass production than on plant richness. The number of generations decreased, in line with the hypothesis that species living in habitats subjected to greater disturbance need higher reproductive rates. 4. Butterfly communities underwent substantial changes, as indicated by composition similarity and species population trends. Grassland specialists were forced to disperse from the abandoned meadows and search for refugial habitats, allowing the establishment of new populations in the contiguous managed meadow. 5. Our study shows that grassland abandonment had immediate strong effects on butterflies, acting as an excellent indicator of habitat change. It also points out to the substitution of grassland specialists by common butterflies, less important for conservation purposes. © 2009 The Royal Entomological Society.

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Interannual and seasonal changes in the soil exchange rates of monoterpenes and other VOCs in a Mediterranean shrubland

Asensio D., Peñuelas J., Prieto P., Estiarte M., Filella I., Llusià J. (2008) Interannual and seasonal changes in the soil exchange rates of monoterpenes and other VOCs in a Mediterranean shrubland. European Journal of Soil Science. 59: 878-891.
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Doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2389.2008.01057.x

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Information about soil VOC inventories and exchange rates in different soils is very scarce. Seasonality of soil VOC exchange rates is also largely unknown, despite the increasing interest in some soil volatile compounds, such as monoterpenes, because of their important role in soil ecology. We aimed to explore and quantify soil VOC exchange rates in a Mediterranean shrubland and their seasonality. Measurements of soil VOC exchange were taken using GC-MS and PTR-MS techniques, together with soil temperature, soil moisture and soil CO2 efflux measurements, during two annual campaigns with contrasting precipitation. Methanol, acetic acid, ethyl acetate, acetaldehyde, acetone, C3 and C4 carbonyls (such as methyl ethyl ketone), α-pinene and limonene, showed the highest emission rates. Maximum soil monoterpene emission rates were very low (0.003 nmol m-2 s -1) compared with foliar monoterpene emission rates. The emission rates of the other VOCs were also low (maximum 0.8 nmol m-2 s -1) except for methanol (1.2 nmol m-2 s-1). Maximum soil uptake rates for some VOCs, such as methanol and acetonitrile (ranging from -0.1 to -0.5 nmol m-2 s-1) were, however, comparable with foliar uptake rates. Further studies are needed to corroborate these results and the possible importance of the soil VOC sink in regional chemistry-climate models. Long-term severe drought increased soil monoterpene emission rates in this Mediterranean shrubland. The increases seem to be linked to changes in the soil's physical properties induced by low soil moisture. Unlike monoterpenes, other soil VOC emission rates decreased when soil moisture was low. The results suggest a seasonal control of soil temperature on the emission rates of monoterpenes and other VOCs. The emission rates increase with soil temperature. Positive correlations between the VOC exchange rates and the soil CO2 fluxes suggest that phenology of roots and microorganisms also controls seasonal changes in soil VOCs in this Mediterranean shrubland. © 2008 The Authors.

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Remote estimation of carbon dioxide uptake by a Mediterranean forest.

Garbulsky MF, Peñuelas J, Papale D, Filella I (2008) Remote estimation of carbon dioxide uptake by a Mediterranean forest. Global Change Biology 14: 2860-2867. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2486.2008.01684.x.

Estimación de la eficiencia del uso de la radiación en bosques mediterráneaos a partir de datos MODIS. Uso del Índixce de Reflectancia Fotoquímica (PRI).

Garbulsky MF, Peñuelas J, Ourcival JM, Filella I (2008) Estimación de la eficiencia del uso de la radiación en bosques mediterráneaos a partir de datos MODIS. Uso del Índixce de Reflectancia Fotoquímica (PRI). Ecosistemas 17: 89-97.

El canvi climàtic altera i alterarà la vida als ecosistemes terrestres Catalans.

Peñuelas J, Filella I, Estiarte M, Ogaya R, Llusià J, Sardans J, Jump A, Garbulsky M, Carrillo B, Stefanescu C, Lloret F, Terradas J (2008) El canvi climàtic altera i alterarà la vida als ecosistemes terrestres Catalans. L'Atzavara 16: 13-28.

Climate change and phenology, adaptation, migration and extinction in plant species.In Climate Change and Systematics,

Peñuelas J, Filella I, Estiarte M, Ogaya R, LLusià J, Sardans J, Jump A, Garbulsky M, Coll M, Diaz de Quijano M, Seco R, Salvador Blanch J, Owen S, Curiel J, Carnicer J, Boada M, Stefanescu C, Lloret F, Terradas J (2008) Climate change and phenology, adaptation, migration and extinction in plant species.In Climate Change and Systematics, Trinity College Dublin pp. 16.

From Phosphorous and VOCs to Biodiversity: some studies on the effects of global change inspired by Margalef’s legacy. (2008).. In: F. Valladares, A. Camacho, A. Elosegi, C. Gracia, M. Estrada, J.C. Senar, J.M. Gili (eds.), Unity in Diversity. Reflection

Peñuelas J, Jump A, Sardans J, Filella I, Estiarte M, Ogaya R, Llusià J, Owen S, Lloret F (2008) From Phosphorous and VOCs to Biodiversity: some studies on the effects of global change inspired by Margalef’s legacy. (2008).. In: F. Valladares, A. Camacho, A. Elosegi, C. Gracia, M. Estrada, J.C. Senar, J.M. Gili (eds.), Unity in Diversity. Reflection s on Ecology after the legacy of Ramon Margalef, pp. 83-94. Fundación BBVA, Bilbao.

Formaldehyde emission and uptake by Mediterranean trees Quercus ilex and Pinus halepensis

Seco R., Peñuelas J., Filella I. (2008) Formaldehyde emission and uptake by Mediterranean trees Quercus ilex and Pinus halepensis. Atmospheric Environment. 42: 7907-7914.
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Doi: 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2008.07.006

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Formaldehyde (FA) is an ubiquitous gas in the atmosphere which reaches notable concentrations in polluted areas and can have great impact on human health. We studied FA exchange between air and two widespread Mediterranean tree species, Quercus ilex and Pinus halepensis. Experiments were conducted at the leaf level under laboratory conditions using air from outside the building. In both plant species FA exchange was mainly determined by the atmospheric mixing ratios, with a compensation point calculated around 20 ppbv. Higher values led to uptake and lower values to emission. The second factor that regulated FA exchange was stomatal conductance. FA exchange followed a diurnal cycle with the greatest exchange when stomatal conductance was at maximum. Such stomatal control is consistent with previous studies and is probably due to the high water solubility of FA, resulting in stomatal transpiration being its main exchange pathway. We also observed this relationship between stomatal conductance and FA exchange under conditions of drought and posterior rewatering, in which changes in stomatal conductance were paralleled by changes in FA exchange. Under projected future conditions of enhanced aridity in the Mediterranean, drought-driven limitations of FA exchange may be more relevant. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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On-line screening of soil VOCs exchange responses to moisture, temperature and root presence

Asensio D., Peñuelas J., Filella I., Llusià J. (2007) On-line screening of soil VOCs exchange responses to moisture, temperature and root presence. Plant and Soil. 291: 249-261.
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Doi: 10.1007/s11104-006-9190-4

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The exchanges of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) between soils and the atmosphere are poorly known. We investigated VOC exchange rates and how they were influenced by soil moisture, temperature and the presence of plant roots in a Mediterranean forest soil. We measured VOC exchange rates along a soil moisture gradient (5%-12.5%-20%-27.5% v/v) and a temperature gradient (10°C-15°C-25°C-35°C) using PTR-MS. Monoterpenes were identified with GC-MS. Soils were a sink rather than a source of VOCs in both soil moisture and temperature treatments (-2.16 ± 0.35 nmol m-2 s-1 and -4.90 ± 1.24 nmol m-2 s-1 respectively). Most compounds observed were oxygenated VOCs like alcohols, aldehydes and ketones and aromatic hydrocarbons. Other volatiles such as acetic acid and ethyl acetate were also observed. All those compounds had very low exchange rates (maximum uptake rates from -0.8 nmol m-2 s -1 to -0.6 nmol m-2 s-1 for methanol and acetic acid). Monoterpene exchange ranged only from -0.004 nmol m-2 s -1 to 0.004 nmol m-2 s-1 and limonene and α-pinene were the most abundant compounds. Increasing soil moisture resulted in higher soil sink activity possibly due to increases in microbial VOCs uptake activity. No general pattern of response was found in the temperature gradient for total VOCs. Roots decreased the emission of many compounds under increasing soil moisture and under increasing soil temperature. While our results showed that emission of some soil VOCs might be enhanced by the increases in soil temperature and that the uptake of most soil VOCs uptake might be reduced by the decreases of soil water availability, the low exchange rates measured indicated that soil-atmosphere VOC exchange in this system are unlikely to play an important role in atmospheric chemistry. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

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Interannual and interseasonal soil CO2 efflux and VOC exchange rates in a Mediterranean holm oak forest in response to experimental drought

Asensio D., Peñuelas J., Llusià J., Ogaya R., Filella I. (2007) Interannual and interseasonal soil CO2 efflux and VOC exchange rates in a Mediterranean holm oak forest in response to experimental drought. Soil Biology and Biochemistry. 39: 2471-2484.
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Doi: 10.1016/j.soilbio.2007.04.019

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Climate models predict drier conditions in the next decades in the Mediterranean basin. Given the importance of soil CO2 efflux in the global carbon balance and the important role of soil monoterpene and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil ecology, we aimed to study the effects of the predicted drought on soil CO2, monoterpenes and other VOC exchange rates and their seasonal and interannual variations. We decreased soil water availability in a Mediterranean holm oak forest soil by means of an experimental drought system performed since 1999 to the present. Measurements of soil gas exchange were carried out with IRGA, GC and PTR-MS techniques during two annual campaigns of contrasting precipitation. Soil respiration was twice higher the wet year than the dry year (2.27±0.26 and 1.05±0.15, respectively), and varied seasonally from 3.76±0.85 μmol m-2 s-1 in spring, to 0.13±0.01 μmol m-2 s-1 in summer. These results highlight the strong interannual and interseasonal variation in CO2 efflux in Mediterranean ecosystems. The drought treatment produced a significant soil respiration reduction in drought plots in the wet sampling period. This reduction was even higher in wet springs (43% average reduction). These results show (1) that soil moisture is the main factor driving seasonal and interannual variations in soil respiration and (2) that the response of soil respiration to increased temperature is constrained by soil moisture. The results also show an additional control of soil CO2 efflux by physiology and phenology of trees and animals. Soil monoterpene exchange rates ranged from -0.01 to 0.004 nmol m-2 s-1, thus the contribution of this Mediterranean holm oak forest soil to the total monoterpenes atmospheric budget seems to be very low. Responses of individual monoterpenes and VOCs to the drought treatment were different depending on the compound. This suggests that the effect of soil moisture reduction in the monoterpenes and VOC exchange rates seems to be dependent on monoterpene and VOC type. In general, soil monoterpene and other VOC exchange rates were not correlated with soil CO2 efflux. In all cases, only a low proportion of variance was explained by the soil moisture changes, since almost all VOCs increased their emission rates in summer 2005, probably due to the effect of high soil temperature. Results indicate thus that physical and biological processes in soil are controlling soil VOC exchange but further research is needed on how these factors interact to produce the observed VOCs exchange responses. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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