Feeding inhibition in the soil collembolan Folsomia candida as an endpoint for the estimation of organic waste ecotoxicity

Domene X., Natal-Da-Luz T., Alcañiz J.M., Andrés P., Sousa J.P. (2007) Feeding inhibition in the soil collembolan Folsomia candida as an endpoint for the estimation of organic waste ecotoxicity. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. 26: 1538-1544.
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Doi: 10.1897/06-623R.1

Resum:

Despite the increasing quantities of organic wastes that are being reused in soils, there are few studies that focus on the selection of bioassays for the ecotoxicological risk assessment of organic wastes to soils. In the present study, differences in feeding inhibition in the soil collembolan Folsomia Candida were evaluated as an ecotoxicological endpoint for the assessment of risk to soils amended with polluted organic wastes. Seven organic wastes (dewatered sewage sludges, thermally dried sewage sludges, composted sewage sludges, and a thermally dried pig slurry) were tested. These wastes had different origins, treatments, and pollutant burdens, and were selected as a representative sample of the wide variety of wastes currently generated. A clear dose response was observed for this parameter, with an increase in percentage of individual feeding inhibition with increased doses of organic wastes. More significantly, feeding inhibition correlated highly with mortality and reproduction inhibition in the different wastes. Composted sludges displayed the lowest toxicity, followed by thermally dried sludge and dewatered sludge. Thermally dried pig slurry showed the highest toxicity for feeding, with lower median effective concentration (EC50) values than the lowest dose tested. Among waste physicochemical parameters and pollutants, low organic matter stability appeared to be the main predictor of potential adverse effects on soil fauna, because it correlated significantly with feeding inhibition and mortality. Furthermore, feeding inhibition tests were run over a short exposure time (less than 7 d), which, together with the results obtained, makes this bioassay a good screening tool for organic waste toxicity. © 2007 SETAC.

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Estimation of safe amendment rates with organic wastes using data from bioassays. In: Sierra et al (editors) Proceedings of the International Meeting on Soil and Wetland Ecotoxicology.

Domene X., Ramírez W, Mattana S, Ortiz O, Alcañiz J, Andrés P (2007) Estimation of safe amendment rates with organic wastes using data from bioassays. In: Sierra et al (editors) Proceedings of the International Meeting on Soil and Wetland Ecotoxicology. SOWETOX 2007, CREAF, UB, UdG and ICEA ISBN 978-84-475-3247-6

Ecotoxicological and fertilizing effects of dewatered, composted and dry sewage sludge on soil mesofauna: A TME experiment

Andrés P., Domene X. (2005) Ecotoxicological and fertilizing effects of dewatered, composted and dry sewage sludge on soil mesofauna: A TME experiment. Ecotoxicology. 14: 545-557.
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Doi: 10.1007/s10646-005-0006-8

Resum:

The effects of dewatered, composted and dry urban sewage sludge on the soil mesofauna were tested in mesocosms. PVC containers were filled with soil/sludge mixtures in a proportion to amount to 6% organic matter content and were colonized with soil fauna coming from undisturbed forest soils. Mesocosms were incubated under laboratory conditions for 7, 30, 60, 120 and 180 days, after which fauna was extracted in Berlese funnels. The animals were classified at different taxonomic levels. Acari were classified to the suborder level for Astigmata, to the family level for Mesostigmata and Prostigmata and to the species level for Cryptostigmata. Acute- and medium-term effects were determined on the faunal density, relative abundance of the main taxa and community structure. Prostigmata were sensitive to the acute effect of the sludge, whereas Mesostigmata and particularly Cryptostigmata were sensitive to its medium-term effect. The most negative effects were found for dry sludge, which caused acute and medium-term effects on the invertebrate communities and on the soil trophic structure. © 2005 Springer Science + Business Media, Inc.

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