A MODIS photochemical reflectance index (PRI) as an estimator of isoprene emissions in a temperate deciduous forest

Filella I., Zhang C., Seco R., Potosnak M., Guenther A., Karl T., Gamon J., Pallardy S., Gu L., Kim S., Balzarolo M., Fernandez-Martinez M., Penuelas J. (2018) A MODIS photochemical reflectance index (PRI) as an estimator of isoprene emissions in a temperate deciduous forest. Remote Sensing. 10: 0-0.
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Doi: 10.3390/rs10040557

Resum:

The quantification of isoprene and monoterpene emissions at the ecosystem level with available models and field measurements is not entirely satisfactory. Remote-sensing techniques can extend the spatial and temporal assessment of isoprenoid fluxes. Detecting the exchange of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) using these techniques is, however, a very challenging goal. Recent evidence suggests that a simple remotely sensed index, the photochemical reflectance index (PRI), which is indicative of light-use efficiency, relative pigment levels and excess reducing power, is a good indirect estimator of foliar isoprenoid emissions. We tested the ability of PRI to assess isoprenoid fluxes in a temperate deciduous forest in central USA throughout the entire growing season and under moderate and extreme drought conditions. We compared PRI time series calculated with MODIS bands to isoprene emissions measured with eddy covariance. MODIS PRI was correlated with isoprene emissions for most of the season, until emissions peaked. MODIS PRI was also able to detect the timing of the annual peak of emissions, even when it was advanced in response to drought conditions. PRI is thus a promising index to estimate isoprene emissions when it is complemented by information on potential emission. It may also be used to further improve models of isoprene emission under drought and other stress conditions. Direct estimation of isoprene emission by PRI is, however, limited, because PRI estimates LUE, and the relationship between LUE and isoprene emissions can be modified by severe stress conditions. © 2018 by the authors.

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Seasonal and diurnal variations of plant isoprenoid emissions from two dominant species in Mediterranean shrubland and forest submitted to experimental drought

Mu Z., Llusià J., Liu D., Ogaya R., Asensio D., Zhang C., Peñuelas J. (2018) Seasonal and diurnal variations of plant isoprenoid emissions from two dominant species in Mediterranean shrubland and forest submitted to experimental drought. Atmospheric Environment. 191: 105-115.
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Doi: 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2018.08.010

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We tested the effect of increasing drought conditions in the Mediterranean Basin on isoprenoid emissions for the coming decades by analyzing their effect experimentally on the dominant Mediterranean species Erica multiflora in a Garraf shrubland and Quercus ilex in a Prades forest in Catalonia (Spain). Drought was simulated in Garraf using automatically sliding curtains to decrease the amount of soil moisture by 5% and in Prades by partial rainfall exclusion and runoff exclusion for a 25% decrease. We measured photosynthetic rates (A), stomatal conductance (gs) and rates of isoprenoid emission in the morning and at midday for four seasons and determined the relationship of emission rates with environmental conditions. Terpenes were emitted by both species, but only E. multiflora emitted isoprene. α-Pinene and limonene were the most abundant terpenes. Isoprenoid emissions increased with air temperature and generally decreased as the amount of soil moisture increased. The results of this study suggest that higher isoprenoid emissions can be expected in the warmer and drier conditions predicted for the coming decades in the Mediterranean region. © 2018

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Remotely-sensed detection of effects of extreme droughts on gross primary production

Vicca S., Balzarolo M., Filella I., Granier A., Herbst M., Knohl A., Longdoz B., Mund M., Nagy Z., Pintér K., Rambal S., Verbesselt J., Verger A., Zeileis A., Zhang C., Peñuelas J. (2016) Remotely-sensed detection of effects of extreme droughts on gross primary production. Scientific Reports. 6: 0-0.
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Doi: 10.1038/srep28269

Resum:

Severe droughts strongly impact photosynthesis (GPP), and satellite imagery has yet to demonstrate its ability to detect drought effects. Especially changes in vegetation functioning when vegetation state remains unaltered (no browning or defoliation) pose a challenge to satellite-derived indicators. We evaluated the performance of different satellite indicators to detect strong drought effects on GPP in a beech forest in France (Hesse), where vegetation state remained largely unaffected while GPP decreased substantially. We compared the results with three additional sites: a Mediterranean holm oak forest (Puéchabon), a temperate beech forest (Hainich), and a semi-arid grassland (Bugacpuszta). In Hesse, a three-year reduction in GPP following drought was detected only by the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI). The Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) also detected this drought effect, but only after normalization for absorbed light. In Puéchabon normalized PRI outperformed the other indicators, while the short-term drought effect in Hainich was not detected by any tested indicator. In contrast, most indicators, but not PRI, captured the drought effects in Bugacpuszta. Hence, PRI improved detection of drought effects on GPP in forests and we propose that PRI normalized for absorbed light is considered in future algorithms to estimate GPP from space.

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Linking OMI HCHO and MODIS PRI satellite data with BVOCS emissions in NE Spain

Kefauver S.C., Filella I., Zhang C., Penuelas J. (2015) Linking OMI HCHO and MODIS PRI satellite data with BVOCS emissions in NE Spain. International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS). 2015-November: 2661-2664.
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Doi: 10.1109/IGARSS.2015.7326360

Resum:

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play several important roles on tropospheric chemical composition. Biogenic VOCs (BVOCs) are the largest source of NMVOCs (non-methane VOCs), accounting for the release of up to 10% of total C fixed by plants in photosynthesis. As isoprene is often the dominant source of atmospheric formaldehyde (HCHO) detected using satellite sensors, it is often correlated directly to satellite HCHO observations without accounting for other HCHO sources. Here we investigate the importance of quantifying monoterpene emissions when linking remotely sensed HCHO vertical columns to terrestrial BVOCs emissions at four different ecosystems in NE Spain where monoterpene-isoprene emissions ratios are known to be unusually high. Average HCHO yield for present monoterpenes was approximately 29% compared to 45% for isoprene. Including monoterpene HCHO yield contributions in total atmospheric HCHO concentrations improved correlations from R2 of 0.35 to 0.66 and R2 of 0.56 to 0.89 when comparing OMI HCHO and MODIS PRI satellite with HCHO field measurements, respectively. © 2015 IEEE.

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