Comparing cognition across species [3] (multiple letters)

Reader S.M., Sol D., Lefebvre L., Roth G., Dicke U. (2005) Comparing cognition across species [3] (multiple letters). Trends in Cognitive Sciences. 9: 411-412.
Enllaç
Doi: 10.1016/j.tics.2005.07.007

Resum:

[No abstract available]

Llegeix més

Brain size, innovative propensity and migratory behaviour in temperate Palaearctic birds

Sol D., Lefebvre L., Rodríguez-Teijeiro J.D. (2005) Brain size, innovative propensity and migratory behaviour in temperate Palaearctic birds. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 272: 1433-1441.
Enllaç
Doi: 10.1098/rspb.2005.3099

Resum:

The evolution of migration in birds remains an outstanding, unresolved question in evolutionary ecology. A particularly intriguing question is why individuals in some species have been selected to migrate, whereas in other species they have been selected to be sedentary. In this paper, we suggest that this diverging selection might partially result from differences among species in the behavioural flexibility of their responses to seasonal changes in the environment. This hypothesis is supported in a comparative analysis of Palaearctic passerines. First, resident species tend to rely more on innovative feeding behaviours in winter, when food is harder to find, than in other seasons. Second, species with larger brains, relative to their body size, and a higher propensity for innovative behaviours tend to be resident, while less flexible species tend to be migratory. Residence also appears to be less likely in species that occur in more northerly regions, exploit temporally available food sources, inhabit non-buffered habitats and have smaller bodies. Yet, the role of behavioural flexibility as a response to seasonal environments is largely independent of these other factors. Therefore, species with greater foraging flexibility seem to be able to cope with seasonal environments better, while less flexible species are forced to become migratory. © 2005 The Royal Society.

Llegeix més

Behavioral drive or behavioral inhibition in evolution: Subspecific diversification in holarctic passerines

Sol D., Stirling D.G., Lefebvre L. (2005) Behavioral drive or behavioral inhibition in evolution: Subspecific diversification in holarctic passerines. Evolution. 59: 2669-2677.
Enllaç
Doi: 10.1554/05-196.1

Resum:

Behavioral changes have long been hypothesized to be an important driver of evolutionary diversification in animals, as they expose individuals to new environmental pressures and thus favor evolutionary divergence. There have been few empirical tests of this hypothesis, however, and the mechanisms linking behavioral changes and diversification processes remain controversial. We show here that Holarctic passerines with large brain size relative to body size, a character correlated with a high propensity for behavioral changes, generally have experienced more extensive subspecific diversification. This effect appears to be largely independent of other well-known mechanisms thought to promote diversification. As suggested by path analysis, relative brain size seems to affect diversification directly rather than indirectly through its presumed effect on range expansion, which is consistent with the original formulation of the behavioral drive hypothesis. Thus, the results support the long-held, intuitive hypothesis that behavioral changes facilitate evolutionary diversification. © 2005 The Society for the Study of Evolution. All rights reserved.

Llegeix més