Timing of eclosion affects diapause development, fat body consumption and longevity in Osmia lignaria, a univoltine, adult-wintering solitary bee

Bosch J., Sgolastra F., Kemp W.P. (2010) Timing of eclosion affects diapause development, fat body consumption and longevity in Osmia lignaria, a univoltine, adult-wintering solitary bee. Journal of Insect Physiology. 56: 1949-1957.
Enllaç
Doi: 10.1016/j.jinsphys.2010.08.017

Resum:

Most insects from temperate areas enter diapause ahead of winter. Species diapausing in a feeding stage and accumulating metabolic reserves during permissive pre-wintering conditions are expected to enter diapause shortly before the onset of winter. In contrast, species diapausing in a non-feeding stage are expected to lower their metabolism as soon as possible to avoid excessive consumption of metabolic reserves. The solitary bee Osmia lignaria winters as a non-feeding adult within its cocoon, but previous studies show important weight losses and increased winter mortality in populations pre-wintered for extended periods. We measured respiration rates to assess diapause initiation and maintenance during pre-wintering, and tested whether timing of adult eclosion affected fitness by measuring fat body depletion, winter mortality and post-winter longevity. We worked with different cohorts of a population reared under natural conditions, and manipulated pre-wintering duration in a population reared under artificial conditions. In agreement with our expectation, O. lignaria lower their metabolic rates within a few days of adult eclosion, but nonetheless suffer strong weight loss during pre-wintering. Early developing individuals suffer greater weight loss and fat body depletion, and have short post-winter longevity. Although, we found no differences in winter mortality among treatments, our results indicate that increased mortality may occur in years with late winter arrivals. We discuss fundamental ecophysiological differences between adult and prepupal diapause within the Megachilidae, and hypothesize that species wintering as adults will be more negatively affected by a situation of extended summers under a scenario of global warming. © 2010.

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Relación entre el grado de madurez del bosque y las comunidades de himenópteros voladores y micromamíferos en el Parque Nacional de Aiguestortes i Estany de Sant Maurici. En: Proyectos de investigación en parques nacionales: 2006-2009. L. Ramírez y B. A

Comas L, Arnan X, Gracia M, Retana J, Bosch J (2010) Relación entre el grado de madurez del bosque y las comunidades de himenópteros voladores y micromamíferos en el Parque Nacional de Aiguestortes i Estany de Sant Maurici. En: Proyectos de investigación en parques nacionales: 2006-2009. L. Ramírez y B. A sensio (Eds.). Organismo Autónomo de Parques Nacionales pp. 327-341.

Nest establishment, pollination efficiency, and reproductive success of megachile rotundata (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) in relation to resource availability in field enclosures

Pitts-Singer T.L., Bosch J. (2010) Nest establishment, pollination efficiency, and reproductive success of megachile rotundata (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) in relation to resource availability in field enclosures. Environmental Entomology. 39: 149-158.
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Doi: 10.1603/EN09077

Resum:

The alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata (Fabricius), is used to pollinate alfalfa, Medicago sativa L., for seed production in the United States and Canada. It is difficult to reliably sustain commercial M. rotundata populations in the United States because of problems with disease, parasites, predators, and unexplained mortality. One possible explanation for early immature mortality is that, relative to floral availability, superfluous numbers of bees are released in alfalfa fields where resources quickly become limited. Our objective was to determine how M. rotundata density affects bee nesting, pollination efficiency, and reproductive success. Various numbers of bees were released into enclosures on an alfalfa field, but only 1090% of released female bees established nests. Therefore, a "bee density index" was derived for each enclosure from the number of established females and number of open flowers over time. As the density index increased, significant reductions occurred in the number of pollinated flowers, number of nests, and number of cells produced per bee, as well as the percentage of cells that produced viable prepupae by summer's end and the percentage that produced adult bees. The percentage of cells resulting in early brood mortality (i.e., pollen balls) significantly increased as the density index increased. We conclude that bee nest establishment, pollination efficiency, and reproductive success are compromised when bee densities are high relative to floral resource availability. Open field studies are needed to determine commercial bee densities that result in sustainable bee populations and adequate pollination for profitable alfalfa seed production.

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Effect of temperature regime on diapause intensity in an adult-wintering Hymenopteran with obligate diapause

Sgolastra F., Bosch J., Molowny-Horas R., Maini S., Kemp W.P. (2010) Effect of temperature regime on diapause intensity in an adult-wintering Hymenopteran with obligate diapause. Journal of Insect Physiology. 56: 185-194.
Enllaç
Doi: 10.1016/j.jinsphys.2009.10.001

Resum:

Osmia lignaria is a solitary bee that over-winters as a fully eclosed, cocooned, unfed adult. Our objective is to understand the effect of wintering temperature on diapause maintenance and termination in this species. We measure respiration rates and weight loss in individuals exposed to various wintering temperatures (0, 4, 7, 22 °C, outdoors) and durations (28, 84, 140, 196, 252 days). We use time to emerge and respiration response (respiration rate measured at 22 °C) as indicators of diapause intensity. Adults spontaneously lower their respiration rates to ∼0.1 ml/g h within 1 month after adult eclosion, indicating obligatory diapause. Non-wintered individuals maintain low respiration rates, but lose weight rapidly and die by mid-winter. In wintered adults, two phases can be distinguished. First, respiration response undergoes a rapid increase and then reaches a plateau. This phase is similar in bees wintered at 0, 4 and 7 °C. In the second phase, respiration response undergoes an exponential increase, which is more pronounced at the warmer temperatures. Composite exponential functions provide a good fit to the observed respiration patterns. Adults whose respiration response has reached 0.45 ml/g h emerge promptly when exposed to 20 °C, indicating diapause completion. Individuals wintered for short periods do not reach such respiration levels. When exposed to 20 °C these individuals lower their metabolic rate, and their emergence time is extended. The relationship between respiration rates and emergence time follows a negative exponential function. We propose two alternative models of diapause termination to interpret these results. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

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