Deconstructing the native-exotic richness relationship in plants

Bartomeus I., Sol D., Pino J., Vicente P., Font X. (2012) Deconstructing the native-exotic richness relationship in plants. Global Ecology and Biogeography. 21: 524-533.
Enllaç
Doi: 10.1111/j.1466-8238.2011.00708.x

Resum:

Aim Classic theory suggests that species-rich communities should be more resistant to the establishment of exotic species than species-poor communities. Although this theory predicts that exotic species should be less diverse in regions that contain more native species, macroecological analyses often find that the correlation between exotic and native species richness is positive rather than negative. To reconcile results with theory, we explore to what extent climatic conditions, landscape heterogeneity and anthropogenic disturbance may explain the positive relationship between native and exotic plant richness. Location Catalonia (western Mediterranean region). Methods We integrated floristic records and GIS-based environmental measures to make spatially explicit 10-km grid cells. We asked whether the observed positive relationship between native and exotic plant richness (R 2= 0.11) resulted from the addition of several negative correlations corresponding to different environmental conditions identified with cluster analysis. Moreover, we directly quantified the importance of common causal effects with a structural equation modelling framework. Results We found no evidence that the relationship between native and exotic plant richness was negative when the comparison was made within environmentally homogeneous groups. Although there were common factors explaining both native and exotic richness, mainly associated with landscape heterogeneity and human pressure, these factors only explained 17.2% of the total correlation. Nevertheless, when the comparison was restricted to native plants associated with human-disturbed (i.e. ruderal) ecosystems, the relationship was stronger (R 2= 0.52) and the fraction explained by common factors increased substantially (58.3%). Main conclusions While our results confirm that the positive correlation between exotic and native plant richness is in part explained by common extrinsic factors, they also highlight the great importance of anthropic factors that - by reducing biotic resistance - facilitate the establishment and spread of both exotic and native plants that tolerate disturbed environments. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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What does make a species a successful invader? .

Sol D (2012) What does make a species a successful invader? Invited speaker, 2012 Margalef Price, Prof. Dr. D. Simberloff. October 31.

Unraveling the life history of successful invaders.

Sol D (2012) Unraveling the life history of successful invaders. Invited seminar, Department of Ecology, University of Barcelona, October 19, 2012.

Exploring or avoiding novel food resources? The novelty conflict in an invasive bird.

Bartomeus I, Sol D, Griffin A (2012) Exploring or avoiding novel food resources? The novelty conflict in an invasive bird. Oral presentation, Animal Behavior Society conference, New Mexico (USA).

Innovative behaviours in invasive common mynas: Creativity, motivation or emotional responses?.

Sol D, Griffin A, Bartomeus I (2012) Innovative behaviours in invasive common mynas: Creativity, motivation or emotional responses?. Animal Behaviour 83: 179-188.

Unraveling the life history of successful invaders. Invited seminar.

Sol D (2012) Unraveling the life history of successful invaders. Invited seminar. University of Fribourg (Switzerland) December 18, 2012.

Life history, behavioral responses and success in novel environments.

Sol D (2012) Life history, behavioral responses and success in novel environments. Invited speaker, Presidential Symposium on behavior and plasticity at the Animal Behavior Society conference, New Mexico (USA).

Unraveling the life history of successful invaders.

Sol D, Maspons J, Vall-llosera M, Bartomeus I, García-Peña GE, Piñol J, Freckleton RP (2012) Unraveling the life history of successful invaders. Oral presentation, 7th Neobiota International conference, Pontevedra (Spain), 2012.

The effect of bed-hedging on introduced populations.

Maspons J, Sol D (2012) The effect of bed-hedging on introduced populations. Poster, 7th Neobiota International conference, Pontevedra (Spain), 2012.

TEASIng apart alien species risk assessments: A framework for best practices

Leung B., Roura-Pascual N., Bacher S., Heikkilä J., Brotons L., Burgman M.A., Dehnen-Schmutz K., Essl F., Hulme P.E., Richardson D.M., Sol D., Vilà M. (2012) TEASIng apart alien species risk assessments: A framework for best practices. Ecology Letters. 15: 1475-1493.
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Doi: 10.1111/ele.12003

Resum:

Some alien species cause substantial impacts, yet most are innocuous. Given limited resources, forecasting risks from alien species will help prioritise management. Given that risk assessment (RA) approaches vary widely, a synthesis is timely to highlight best practices. We reviewed quantitative and scoring RAs, integrating > 300 publications into arguably the most rigorous quantitative RA framework currently existing, and mapping each study onto our framework, which combines Transport, Establishment, Abundance, Spread and Impact (TEASI). Quantitative models generally measured single risk components (78% of studies), often focusing on Establishment alone (79%). Although dominant in academia, quantitative RAs are underused in policy, and should be made more accessible. Accommodating heterogeneous limited data, combining across risk components, and developing generalised RAs across species, space and time without requiring new models for each species may increase attractiveness for policy applications. Comparatively, scoring approaches covered more risk components (50% examined > 3 components), with Impact being the most common component (87%), and have been widely applied in policy (> 57%), but primarily employed expert opinion. Our framework provides guidance for questions asked, combining scores and other improvements. Our risk framework need not be completely parameterised to be informative, but instead identifies opportunities for improvement in alien species RA. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

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