Long-distance windborne dispersal of the moth Cornifrons ulceratalis (Lederer, 1858) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae: Evergestinae) into the northern Mediterranean.

Dantart J, Stefanescu C, Avila A, Alarcón M (2009) Long-distance windborne dispersal of the moth Cornifrons ulceratalis (Lederer, 1858) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae: Evergestinae) into the northern Mediterranean. European Journal Entomology 106: 225-229.

Constatacions biològiques del canvi climàtic a Catalunya.

Peñuelas J, Filella I, Estiarte M, Ogaya R, Llusiè J, Sardans J, Jump A, Garbulsky M, Coll M, Díaz de Quijano M, Seco R, Blanch JS, Owen S, Curiel J, Carnicer J, Boada M, Stefanescu C, Lloret F, TerradasJ (2009) Constatacions biològiques del canvi climàtic a Catalunya. A “Aigua i canvi climàtic: Diagnosi dels impactes previstos a Catalunya” Generalitat de Catalunya, Departament de Medi Ambient i Habitatge, Agencia Catalana de l’Aigua, www.gencat.cat/aca .

Extinction debt: a challenge for biodiversity conservation

Kuussaari M., Bommarco R., Heikkinen R.K., Helm A., Krauss J., Lindborg R., Öckinger E., Pärtel M., Pino J., Rodà F., Stefanescu C., Teder T., Zobel M., Steffan-Dewenter I. (2009) Extinction debt: a challenge for biodiversity conservation. Trends in Ecology and Evolution. 24: 564-571.
Enllaç
Doi: 10.1016/j.tree.2009.04.011

Resum:

Local extinction of species can occur with a substantial delay following habitat loss or degradation. Accumulating evidence suggests that such extinction debts pose a significant but often unrecognized challenge for biodiversity conservation across a wide range of taxa and ecosystems. Species with long generation times and populations near their extinction threshold are most likely to have an extinction debt. However, as long as a species that is predicted to become extinct still persists, there is time for conservation measures such as habitat restoration and landscape management. Standardized long-term monitoring, more high-quality empirical studies on different taxa and ecosystems and further development of analytical methods will help to better quantify extinction debt and protect biodiversity. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Rapid changes in butterfly communities following the abandonment of grasslands: A case study

Stefanescu C., Peñuelas J., Filella I. (2009) Rapid changes in butterfly communities following the abandonment of grasslands: A case study. Insect Conservation and Diversity. 2: 261-269.
Enllaç
Doi: 10.1111/j.1752-4598.2009.00063.x

Resum:

1. Abandonment of grasslands is a major threat for the conservation of biodiversity in Europe. The response of butterflies towards secondary succession has been studied in northern temperate grasslands, but always by comparing sites at different stages. 2. Here, we present a trajectory study based on the monitoring of butterflies from a series of abandoned grasslands in northeast Spain. One additional meadow was traditionally managed for the whole 8-year sampling period and provided a useful control. Both general changes at the community level and species population trends were documented through standardised transect counts. 3. The increase in turf height was neither accompanied by an increase in butterfly diversity nor by consistent trends in body size, dispersal ability and host-plant specialization. However, there was a significant decrease in habitat specialization, consistent with the hypothesis that richness in generalist herbivores is more dependent on biomass production than on plant richness. The number of generations decreased, in line with the hypothesis that species living in habitats subjected to greater disturbance need higher reproductive rates. 4. Butterfly communities underwent substantial changes, as indicated by composition similarity and species population trends. Grassland specialists were forced to disperse from the abandoned meadows and search for refugial habitats, allowing the establishment of new populations in the contiguous managed meadow. 5. Our study shows that grassland abandonment had immediate strong effects on butterflies, acting as an excellent indicator of habitat change. It also points out to the substitution of grassland specialists by common butterflies, less important for conservation purposes. © 2009 The Royal Entomological Society.

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