When a Tree Dies in the Forest: Scaling Climate-Driven Tree Mortality to Ecosystem Water and Carbon Fluxes

Anderegg, W.R.L., Martinez-Vilalta, J., Cailleret, M., Camarero, J.J., Ewers, B.E., Galbraith, D., Gessler, A., Grote, R., Huang, C.-Y., Levick, S.R., Powell, T.L., Rowland, L., Sánchez-Salguero, R., Trotsiuk, V. (2016) When a Tree Dies in the Forest: Scaling Climate-Driven Tree Mortality to Ecosystem Water and Carbon Fluxes. Ecosystems. 19: 1133-1147.
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Doi: 10.1007/s10021-016-9982-1

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Self-thinning in four pine species: an evaluation of potential climate impacts

Brunet-Navarro, P., Sterck, F.J., Vayreda, J., Martinez-Vilalta, J., Mohren, G.M.J. (2016) Self-thinning in four pine species: an evaluation of potential climate impacts. Annals of Forest Science. 73: 1025-1034.
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Doi: 10.1007/s13595-016-0585-y

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Towards a common methodology for developing logistic tree mortality models based on ring-width data

Cailleret, M., Igler, C.I.B., Mann, H.B., Camarero, J.J., Cufar, K., Davi, H., Mészáros, I., Inunno, F.M., Peltoniemi, M., Robert, E.M.R., Suarez, M.L., Tognett, R.I., Martínez-Vilalta, J. (2016) Towards a common methodology for developing logistic tree mortality models based on ring-width data. Ecological Applications. 26: 1827-1841.
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Doi: 10.1890/15-1402.1

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A synthesis of radial growth patterns preceding tree mortality

Cailleret, M., Jansen, S., Robert, E.M.R., Desoto, L., Aakala, T., Antos, J.A., Beikircher, B., Bigler, C., Bugmann, H., Caccianiga, M., Čada, V., Camarero, J.J., Cherubini, P., Cochard, H., Coyea, M.R., Čufar, K., Das, A.J., Davi, H., Delzon, S., Dorman, M., Gea-Izquierdo, G., Gillner, S., Haavik, L.J., Hartmann, H., Hereş, A.-M., Hultine, K.R., Janda, P., Kane, J.M., Kharuk, V.I., Kitzberger, T., Klein, T., Kramer, K., Lens, F., Levanic, T., Linares Calderon, J.C., Lloret, F., Lobo-Do-Vale, R., Lombardi, F., López Rodríguez, R., Mäkinen, H., Mayr, S., Mészáros, I., Metsaranta, J.M., Minunno, F., Oberhuber, W., Papadopoulos, A., Peltoniemi, M., Petritan, A.M., Rohner, B., Sangüesa-Barreda, G., Sarris, D., Smith, J.M., Stan, A.B., Sterck, F., Stojanović, D.B., Suarez, M.L., Svoboda, M., Tognetti, R., Torres-Ruiz, J.M., Trotsiuk, V., Villalba, R., Vodde, F., Westwood, A.R., Wyckoff, P.H., Zafirov, N., Martínez-Vilalta, J. (2016) A synthesis of radial growth patterns preceding tree mortality. Global Change Biology. : 0-0.
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Doi: 10.1111/gcb.13535

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Specific leaf area and hydraulic traits explain niche segregation along an aridity gradient in Mediterranean woody species

Costa-Saura J.M., Martínez-Vilalta J., Trabucco A., Spano D., Mereu S. (2016) Specific leaf area and hydraulic traits explain niche segregation along an aridity gradient in Mediterranean woody species. Perspectives in Plant Ecology, Evolution and Systematics. 21: 23-30.
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Doi: 10.1016/j.ppees.2016.05.001

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Despite growing evidence of changes in plant functional traits (FT) along environmental gradients, the way they shape species niches (i.e. how they alternatively influence the limits, width and environmental optimums of species niche) remains only partially understood. Thus, Species Distribution Models were developed and evaluated using distribution data from the Spanish Forest Inventory for 21of the most common Mediterranean woody species, and used to derive different environmental characteristics of species niche, which were then correlated against species-specific values of 14 FT and combinations of relatively orthogonal FT. Species leaf traits, and in particular Specific Leaf Area (SLA), were highly correlated with species niche characteristics regarding aridity (especially with the more arid limit). Hydraulic traits, i.e. the water potential at which a species loses 50% of xylem hydraulic conductivity due to cavitation (PLC50), and species hydraulic safety margins (SM), were better correlated with species aridity niche optimums. Overall, the best model fits, particularly regarding species' optimum and maximum aridity limit, were obtained when SLA and hydraulic traits (either PLC50 or SM) were used in combination. The study shows how in the Mediterranean region a single trait may be able to explain broad differences in species distributions, but also that the coordination of relatively independent traits achieves a more accurate representation of their environmental limits, particularly at the dry end of the species' range. The approach used in this study relies on the physiological limits of a species and, to a certain extent, on the mechanisms behind them, adding robustness and accuracy to predict species distribution and mortality under climate change scenarios. © 2016 Elsevier GmbH.

Llegeix més

Individual traits as determinants of time to death under extreme drought in Pinus sylvestris L.

Garcia-Forner, N., Sala, A., Biel, C., Save, R., Martínez-Vilalta, J. (2016) Individual traits as determinants of time to death under extreme drought in Pinus sylvestris L.. Tree Physiology. 36: 1196-1209.
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Doi: 10.1093/treephys/tpw040

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Drought-induced vegetation shifts in terrestrial ecosystems: The key role of regeneration dynamics

Martínez-Vilalta J., Lloret F. (2016) Drought-induced vegetation shifts in terrestrial ecosystems: The key role of regeneration dynamics. Global and Planetary Change. 144: 94-108.
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Doi: 10.1016/j.gloplacha.2016.07.009

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Ongoing climate change is modifying climatic conditions worldwide, with a trend towards drier conditions in most regions. Vegetation will respond to these changes, eventually adjusting to the new climate. It is unclear, however, how close different ecosystems are to climate-related tipping points and, thus, how dramatic these vegetation changes will be in the short- to mid-term, given the existence of strong stabilizing processes. Here, we review the published evidence for recent drought-induced vegetation shifts worldwide, addressing the following questions: (i) what are the necessary conditions for vegetation shifts to occur? (ii) How much evidence of drought-induced vegetation shifts do we have at present and where are they occurring? (iii) What are the main processes that favor/oppose the occurrence of shifts at different ecological scales? (iv) What are the complications in detecting and attributing drought-induced vegetation shifts? (v) What ecological factors can interact with drought to promote shifts or stability? We propose a demographic framework to classify the likely outcome of instances of drought-induced mortality, based upon the survival of adults of potential replacement species and the regeneration of both formerly dominant affected species and potential replacement species. Out of 35 selected case studies only eight were clearly consistent with the occurrence of a vegetation shift (species or biome shift), whereas three corresponded to self-replacements in which the affected, formerly dominant species was able to regenerate after suffering drought-induced mortality. The other 24 cases were classified as uncertain, either due to lack of information or, more commonly, because the initially affected and potential replacement species all showed similar levels of regeneration after the mortality event. Overall, potential vegetation transitions were consistent with more drought-resistant species replacing less resistant ones. However, almost half (44%) of the vegetation trajectories associated to the 35 case studies implied no change in the functional type of vegetation. Of those cases implying a functional type change, the most common one was a transition from tree- to shrub-dominated communities. Overall, evidence for drought-induced vegetation shifts is still limited. In this context, we stress the need for improved, long-term monitoring programs with sufficient temporal resolution. We also highlight the critical importance of regeneration in determining the outcome of drought-induced mortality events, and the crucial role of co-drivers, particularly management. Finally, we illustrate how placing vegetation shifts in a biogeographical and successional context may support progress in our understanding of the underlying processes and the ecosystem-level implications. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

Llegeix més

Water potential regulation, stomatal behaviour and hydraulic transport under drought: Deconstructing the iso/anisohydric concept

Martínez-Vilalta, J., Garcia-Forner, N. (2016) Water potential regulation, stomatal behaviour and hydraulic transport under drought: Deconstructing the iso/anisohydric concept. Plant Cell and Environment. : 0-0.
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Doi: 10.1111/pce.12846

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Dynamics of non-structural carbohydrates in terrestrial plants: A global synthesis

Martínez-Vilalta, J., Sala, A., Asensio, D., Galiano, L., Hoch, G., Palacio, S., Piper, F.I., Lloret, F. (2016) Dynamics of non-structural carbohydrates in terrestrial plants: A global synthesis. Ecological Monographs. 86: 495-516.
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Doi: 10.1002/ecm.1231

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Anthropogenic-driven rapid shifts in tree distribution lead to increased dominance of broadleaf species

Vayreda, J., Martinez-Vilalta, J., Gracia, M., Canadell, J.G., Retana, J. (2016) Anthropogenic-driven rapid shifts in tree distribution lead to increased dominance of broadleaf species. Global Change Biology. 22: 3984-3995.
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Doi: 10.1111/gcb.13394

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